ultramarinus – beyond the sea

Posts tagged “Japanese

ARRIVING IN FURANO (富良野), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.20

Day 6 (3/3).

A sudden downpour greeted our arrival to the farming community as we left Hoshino Resorts Tomamu and entered Minamifurano  or South Furano (南富良野).  A long and winding road cut through fields of rice paddies, wheat and corn, and passed by rows after rows of farming greenhouses against the backdrop of Tokachi Mountain Range (十勝岳).  Further afield, rolling fields of summer flowers had yet reached their peak moment of summer blossom.  We could imagine that at its peak in mid July, these fields could well be covered in rainbow colours: sunflower, poppies, lilies, and most famous of all, different types of lavender.  At one point, we stopped the car right by a small country road, just to taste the sweetness of nature and feel the mountain air after the rain.  Mist rose from the distant mountains beyond farming fields, making a perfect and dreamy picture of Hokkaido countryside. Welcome to Furano!

Located in the heart of Hokkaido Island, Furano is (富良野) a sleepy town about 100km inland from the sea, enjoying a continental climate that sees heavy and powdery snowfall in winter.  Like Niseko, Furano is a popular skiing resort in winter.  During summer, Furano is a rural wonderland famous for its farmlands and vineyards, especially its rolling hills of flowers that includes the iconic lavender.  Drawing large amount of Japanese and Chinese tourists, summer flowers, especially lavender, have imprinted a vivid postcard image in visitors’ mind even before they arrive in Hokkaido.  For the Japanese, the works of scriptwriter Sō Kuramoto (倉本 聰) have presented the beauty of Furano to everyone in the nation in the past 40 years, marking the relative sleepy town in Central Hokkaido onto Japan’s tourist map.

DSC_5751We stopped the car at a small country road to inhale our first breathe of fresh air from Furano.

DSC_5752Furano is well known for its fine agricultural produce.

IMG_9734Large plastic greenhouses could be seen in many areas around Furano.

IMG_9743No matter where in Japan, rice paddies is often the dominate landscape.

IMG_9746In Hokkaido, wheat is also a main staple food for noodles and bread.

IMG_9749In Central Furano, a complex of four retail buildings known as Furano Marche introduces local produce, snacks and souvenir for visitors and foreigners.

IMG_9750We got ourselves some food for a light dinner.

IMG_9753We got ourselves potato fries, hamburger and fried chicken (all ingredients from the region) for dinner.

IMG_9758From Furano Marche, we had the opportunity to try the local sweet white corn, which could be consumed raw.

DSC_5754In Furano, we stayed at Pension Yamasan in the village of Nakafurano (中富良野), the home of the famous lavender farms like Farm Tomita and Saika-no-Sato.

IMG_9762Dried lavender is used as decorations and natural air freshener.

IMG_9763We were free to use the dining hall for breakfast and evening television.

IMG_9764The common area of Pension Yamasan is full of the owner’s character.

IMG_0040Situated on a hill across from Mount Tokachi, Pension Yamasan offered us pleasant view of the mountain range and fields of Nakafurano.

DSC_5796For visitors without their own wheels, railway is their best bet for reaching the lavender farms in Nakafurano.

DSC_5798After the rain, Furano River was a little muddy at Nakafurano.

DSC_5797Despite we were a month too early to see the lavender in full blossom, other summer flowers were indeed everywhere in Nakafurano.

 

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TREATS OF OBIHIRO (帯広), Tokachi (十勝), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.20

Day 6 (2/3).

From Lake Akan (阿寒湖) to Nakafurano (中富良野) where we would stay two nights to explore the rolling hills and farmlands of Furano (富良野) and Biei (美瑛), we drove by Tokachi (十勝), a subprefecture in Central Hokkaido best known for its dairy and agricultural products such as wheat and red beans.  Also known as the land of cheese, some say Tokachi produces about 60% of Japanese cheese.  We didn’t plan to stay in Tokachi, but did make a stop in the subprefecture’s only city, Obihiro (帯広).  There was only one reason: to sample the delicious food of the region.  We weren’t after any fancy kaiseki ryori or seafood feast, but simple local dishes that make use of the best local ingredients of Tokachi.

IMG_0034There is nothing simpler to experience the best of Tokachi (十勝) than have a cup of fresh local milk.

IMG_9711In Obihiro, we made a first stop to Amamuekie, a simple pastry shop housed in a cool container.  Originally worked in the music industry, the husband and wife of Iwamoto family (岩本夫妻) turned their interest in nature and healthy food and opened Amamuekie.

IMG_7127At Amamuekie, healthy pastry made with plant based ingredients without the use of white sugar and animal ingredients such as dairy and eggs are sold, including this cocoa pound cake made with rice flour.

IMG_7836We picked up several items from Amamuekie, including this hojicha (green tea) biscotti, a tasty fusion of east meets west.

IMG_9713On our way to Obihiro, we made our second stop at Sweet Factory Green, a delightful sweets shop in the small town of Otofuke (音更町).

IMG_9715The cakes, chocolate and ice-cream were all so tempting.

IMG_9721Causal seating were provided on the lawn next to the sweets shop.

IMG_9717_01Sun was high and sky was blue, what a perfect moment to enjoy local ice-cream, a piece of fruit cake and a cup of good coffee.

IMG_9722Finally we arrived in downtown Obihiro (帯広), and parked our car in one of the outdoor parking lot near the main train station.

IMG_7105It took us a little while to figure out the correct procedure to activate the parking sensor for our stall.

IMG_9728Our destination, Butadon Pancho (元祖豚丼), situates right across the street from Obihiro Railway Station.

IMG_9726Butadon Pancho (元祖豚丼) offers just one thing in the menu: Butadon (豚丼) or pork bowl.  After about 20 minutes in the queue, we finally got a small table in the small restaurant.  Founded in 1933, Butadon Pancho claims to be the pioneer restaurant that offered butadon.

IMG_9725Originated from Obihiro, butadon is basically a bowl of rice served with several pieces of local pork, topped with sweet soy sauce and green peas.  The bowl also comes with takuan (沢庵) or pickled daikon radish and miso soup.  Nothing fancy, just a simple local dish but made a perfect lunch for us.

IMG_9732After a little over an hour on the road, we arrived at Hoshino Resorts Tomamu, a vast resort compound that offers a variety of activities for visitors, from skiing in winter to hiking in summer.

IMG_7115The main reason coming to Tomamu was to check out the famous Chapel on the Water by architect Tadao Ando.

IMG_9730Unfortunately, the opening times of the chapel was quite limited.  Quite often, the chapel is occupied for private wedding ceremonies.  We had to leave it for another time, and moved on on our journey to Furano, where we would stay for the night.

 


SILENT NIGHT AT LAKE AKAN (阿寒湖), Kushiro (釧路), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.19

Day 5 (3/3).

About 60km southwest of Lake Mashu, we arrived at Akankohan (阿寒湖畔), our second destination in Akan Mashu National Park.  Under the shadow of volcano Mount Oakan (雄阿寒岳), the onsen resort village Akankohan (阿寒湖畔) right by Lake Akan or Akanko (阿寒湖) is another great place in Eastern Hokkaido to experience the beauty of the region’s volcanic landscape.  While may not be as crystal clear as Lake Mashu, Lake Akan, also a crater lake, is nonetheless also famous for its pure water.  In fact, the pristine quality of the lake water has enabled the famous lake inhabitant, the marimo, to thrive in Lake Akan.  Marimo, a rare ball-like algae, may grow up the size of a football if left untouched for centuries.  Unlike Lake Mashu, Lake Akan has a much bigger human presence especially along the waterfront of Akankohan, where modern ryokans with all kinds of onsen baths, and shops, small museum, and cultural centre about the local Ainu people are established.

We stayed at Akankohan for a night to have a short visit of the lakeside onsen resort.  We didn’t take the tourist cruise boat for a marimo museum visit on a small island in the lake; nor did we do a long hike up to one of the beautiful volcanoes around the lake or visit the Ainu cultural centre.  We did however make a morning forest walk to the boiling bokke mud pool east of the resort village, enjoy a starry night standing on the lakeside boardwalk, and cleanse our bodies and souls in the mineral rich hotspring water of Akan.

IMG_9540At Akankohan, the waterfront is lined with resort hotels and docks for tourist cruise boats.

IMG_9538Located at the waterfront, our hotel Tsuruga Lake Akan Lodge Turano is a comfortable pet-friendly guesthouse with nice views to the lake.

IMG_9545Compared to other lakeside resort hotels, Tsuruga Lake Akan Lodge Turano is much more causal.

IMG_9544There was no hotspring facilities at Tsuruga Lake Akan Lodge Turano, we were invited to use one of Tsuruga’s other hotel’s facility.  Recommended by the hotel staff, we went to Akan Yuku no Sato Tsuruga for its onsen facilities.  During our visit, men were assigned to use the three-level bathing facilities at the lower floor while women at the 8/F outdoor infinity pool facing the lake.

DSC_5551It wasn’t the darkest and clearest night for stargazing, but chilling out in the cool air at Lake Akan after a hearty buffet dinner was delightful.

DSC_5552Clouds and fog moved quickly across the sky.  Stars were still visible in between.

DSC_5558At Akankohan (阿寒湖畔), Mount Oakan (雄阿寒岳) has a dominant presence to the scenery.

DSC_5561Dusk fell upon with a soft touch of orange cast on the moving clouds.

DSC_5580In comparison, the artificial lights from the lakeside hotels looked overwhelmingly bright.

DSC_5586Various boardwalk structures extend out to the lake for small boats and tourist photos.

DSC_5590Last erupted in 2008, Mount Oakan is a shield volcano rises about 900m from the lake.

DSC_5597Swan like recreational boats looked quite out of place in the natural surrounding.

DSC_5595Most multi-level buildings in Akankohan are resort hotels.  Behind the lakeside hotels, a shopping street lined with souvenir shops forms the main thoroughfare for the village.  The entire village looks completely dependent on tourism.

DSC_5601Near our guesthouse Tsuruga Lake Akan Lodge Turano, the lights from the lakeside hotels looked far more overwhelming than the mighty volcano, which sat in tranquility in the background waiting for its next moment of eruption.


MOUNT MASHU TRAIL (摩周岳) , Teshikaga (弟子屈), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.19

Day 5 (2/3).

After a few hours of sleep, we returned to Lake Mashu to seek for another way to enjoy the crater lake and its surrounding landscape.  This time, we took the 14.4km trail along the crater rim up to the top of Mount Mashu or Mashu-dake (857m) in a 4-6 hour walk.  We read from guidebooks and online research that the scenery of Lake Mashu from the top of Mount Mashu would be very promising.  At the onsen village of Mashu, we stopped by a bento takeout restaurant (ほかほか弁当) to order two rice dishes for breakfast, then headed over to Lake Mashu’s Viewpoint 1 to begin our hike.

IMG_9435A terrain model at the visitor centre of Viewpoint 1 gave us a rough idea of the hike, from the trailhead at the south of the crater lake to the peak of Mount Mashu east of the lake.

IMG_9437Soon after the trailhead, we reached the first open lookout of Lake Mashu.

DSC_5431The trail took us along the crater lake on one side, and open plains and distant volcanic landscape on the other.

DSC_5445Most of the trail ran along the rim of the crater lake with little shades.

IMG_9439From time to time, wooden signage indicated how far we were from our destination.

DSC_5456There was pretty much only one trail for most of the time.  It was almost impossible to get lost.

DSC_5477Near the peak, we could fully appreciate the volcanic landscape of the area, including the lush green forest in a caldera next to Lake Mashu.

DSC_5464After the steepest section of the trail, we finally reached the summit of Mount Mashu, a small lookout that offered wonderful panoramas of the area’s volcanic scenery.

IMG_9471From the top, the volcanic scenery of Lake Mashu area was fantastic.

DSC_5474Looking west, the ridge of Mount Mashu led to the eastern edge of Lake Mashu.

IMG_9483Clouds were getting in with the wind but we still had blue sky for most of the day.

IMG_9488Looking north, we could see the eastern tip of Lake Mashu.

DSC_5504With a circumference of about 20km, Lake Mashu is one of the most famous lakes in Hokkaido.  We stayed for 20 minutes or so at the summit all by ourselves, and began the descending journey when another couple followed our footsteps and replaced us at the peak.

DSC_5512Claimed as the clearest water in the world, the beautiful blue colour of Lake Mashu was simply stunning when viewed from above.

DSC_5523The wind was mild and the air was dry, such a perfect day for us to hike at Eastern Hokkaido.

DSC_5527From afar, the tiny island in the middle of Lake Mashu looked funny.

DSC_5529The hike would offer a different scenery if we were to visit in the autumn.

IMG_9512The beauty of Lake Mashu never cease to impress us, despite we were a little tired near the end of the hike.

DSC_5540Finally back to Viewpoint 1, the colour of Lake Mashu had changed due to the constantly moving clouds.  From dawn to mid afternoon, we had fully experienced the sheer beauty of the famous caldera lake.  After about 5 hours of walking, we returned to Viewpoint 1 and treated ourselves with local chocolate milk and a slide of Yubari melon (夕張メロン) , the king of Hokkaido fruit which just broke the record in May 2019 with a pair fetching 5,000,000 JPY (47,000 USD) in auction.

 


SUNRISE AT LAKE MASHU (摩周湖), Teshikaga (弟子屈), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.19

Day 5 (1/3).

Leaving Shitetoko behind, we drove southwest towards another natural marvel of Eastern Hokkaido, the Akan Mashu National Park (阿寒摩周国立公園).  On the lush green plains, stratovolcanoes emerged from the horizon, revealing the violent past of the local geology.  Hot springs, crater lakes, and stratovolcanoes define the characteristics of the area, and have led to the creation of the national park in 1934.  Just 15 minutes of drive from the Viewing Platform 1 of Lake Mashu (摩周湖), we checked in at Masyuko Youth Hostel (摩周湖ユースホステル).  That night, we woke up at 2:30am and drove to the Viewing Platform 1 of Lake Mashu to watch the sunrise, a famous scenic sight in Hokkaido.  In the summer, the sun rises at around 3:30am in Hokkaido, leaving us little time for sleep.

IMG_9287On our way to Akan Mashu National Park , we could see stratovolcanoes rose from the horizon in a distance.

DSC_5272Masyuko Youth Hostel offered us a comfortable place for a short rest before venturing out again to watch the sunrise.

DSC_5275Arriving at Viewing Platform 1 of Lake Mashu, we were stunned to see a sea of clouds blanketed over the area of Kawayu Onsen (川湯温泉).

DSC_5278Looking down from Viewing Platform 1, the water of Lake Mashu appeared like a crystal clear mirror.

DSC_5282Claimed as the clearest lake in the world (with transparency measured at 41.6m back in 1931), Lake Mashu is a beautiful crater lake where visitors can enjoy the scenery from two viewing platforms along the crater rim.  The clarity might have slightly declined in recent decades, but Lake Mashu is still nevertheless an extremely beautiful water body.

DSC_5284Occasionally sea of clouds would appear over Lake Mashu, but not during our visit.

DSC_5316Soon the sun emerged behind the distant mountains to the east.

IMG_9343We enjoyed moments of tranquility at the viewing platform.

IMG_9346Several tourists and photographers stood among us at the viewing platform to watch the sunrise.

DSC_5340While the sun gradually rose over the crater lake, the moon still lingered in the sky behind us.

DSC_5358When the sun was up, the blue water and lush green surroundings changed the ambience of Lake Mashu into a different picture.

DSC_5365The deep blue Mashu Lake looked mysterious and surreal, almost too beautiful to be true.

DSC_5366The rim of the crater lake is now covered by dense vegetation.

DSC_5374 On the other side, clouds and fog continued to cover the foot of Mount Iō (アトサヌプリ) and the Kawayu Onsen (川湯温泉) area.

DSC_5378The entire Kawayu Onsen (川湯温泉) area was blanked in thick fog.

DSC_5380Over to the southwest we could see the stratovolcanoes near what could be the Lake Akan area.

DSC_5402Down in Lake Mashu, the small island stood like a feature sculpture at the centre.

DSC_5424The sea of clouds at Mount Iō (アトサヌプリ) and Kawayu Onsen (川湯温泉) subsided a little as the sun rose further up.

IMG_9426Moisture and thin mist emerged over the water of Lake Mashu.  The mist moved rapidly over the water as if dancing.  At one point thicker mist gathered over the small island like a cotton shield.

DSC_5426The mist over the island soon dispersed into thin air.  As the sun reached high in the sky, we returned to the hostel for another few hours of sleep before coming back to Lake Mashu for hiking later in the day.

 


MOUNT RAUSU (羅臼岳), Shiretoko Peninsula (知床半島), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.18

Day 4 (1/2).

It was the fourth day since we arrived in Shiretoko.  Finally we woke up to a fine morning.  Clouds gathered atop the Shiretoko Mountain Range northwest of Rausu.  We had made reservations for an afternoon whale watching cruise.  Our plan for the morning was to head up to Shiretoko Pass, and do a bit of hiking near Rausu Lake.  It would be quite unfortunate if we were to leave Shiretoko without seeing Mount Rausu (羅臼岳).

At 1661m in height, Mount Rausu is an active stratovolcano that sits above Shiretoko Pass, the highest point on Road 334 between the villages of Utoro and Rausu.  Also known as the Fuji of Shiretoko, Mount Rausu is one of Japan’s 100 Famous Mountains.  Hiking up the volcano takes 6-8 hours round trip, but given our limited time and lack of snow crampons, we would have to leave the hike for another time.

IMG_9085Driving Road 334 up to Shiretoko Pass, we could see the mountains were still covered in clouds.

IMG_9111On our way up, we passed by several covered road sections.

DSC_4457It was a disappointment again when we arrived at Shiretoko Pass (知床峠) and saw Mount Rausu covered in thick clouds.

IMG_9122Though the weather looked quite promising down at coast of Rausu.  We hoped that the fine weather would stay for several more hours so that we could embark on our whale watching cruise in the afternoon.

DSC_4480It was 2.3km from Shiretoko Pass to the trailhead of Lake Rausu Trail.  About five minutes after we walked down the road from the parking lot of Shiretoko Pass, the clouds began to disperse over Mount Rausu.  We could finally see the beautiful volcano right behind us.

DSC_4497Some hikers would prefer taking the bus to cover the 2.3km journey to the trailhead, but there are only four buses per day on the route.

DSC_4495Looking down from the trailhead, the trail began at a marsh area.

DSC_4498We followed a narrow path down to the trailhead of Rausu Lake Trail.

IMG_9146The return trip of Rausu Lake Trail would take about 3-4 hours.  Unfortunately our time was restricted by the afternoon whale watching cruise.  We decided to do a shorter hike by turning back at Marsh 3.

DSC_4528As warned at the trailhead, the early section of the Rausu Lake Trail was flooded like a swamp.  Rubber boots could be rented at the Rausu Visitor Centre.

DSC_4525We soon reached Marsh 2 after a short walk in the flooded path, but there wasn’t much water in the marsh.

IMG_9148Snow was still visible at certain parts of the trail.

DSC_4502After about half an hour from the trailhead, we reached Marsh 3, the destination of our short hike.

DSC_4505Mount Rausu and its reflection at Marsh 3 was the biggest highlight of the hike.  While most hikers would continue on towards Rausu Lake, we had to turn back in order to make back to Rausu on time for our whale watching cruise.

IMG_9170Back to Shiretoko Pass, more clouds were visible over Nemuro Strait and the Russian controlled Kunashir Island.  We were a little worried about the overcast conditions ahead of our whale watching cruise.  After 2.5 days of rainy weather, even few patches of clouds would make us nervous.

 

 


FUREPE FALLS (フレペの滝), Shiretoko Peninsula (知床半島), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.16

Day 2 (3/3).

The weather fluctuated throughout the afternoon.  After lunch, we headed back up to Shiretoko National Park from Utoro to check out Shiretoko Nature Centre, the visitor centre near the park entrance.  The centre houses a large screen theatre showing films of the park, service counters for hikers to obtain trail information, a cafe serving excellent coffee and ice-cream, and a shop selling all kinds of outdoor outfits and souvenir.  After watching a film about a family of Ezo Red Fox at the theatre, we decided to do a short hike.

IMG_6477Only 20 minute of easy walk would bring us to coast of Sea of Okhotsk, where the The Virgin’s Tears or the Furepe Waterfall awaited us.

DSC_4374In the past few decades, efforts had been made to reforest the area after years of pioneer development.

DSC_4382Weather was changing quickly.  At one moment, clouds and mist were moving away from the Shiretoko Mountain Range.

DSC_4383At Furepe Falls, we could only admire the cliff of the waterfall from the opposite side.

DSC_4385A small group of seabirds gathered at the tip of the rock cliff.

DSC_4389From the opposite side, we could see the top part of the Furepe Falls.  The waterfall originates from ground water surfaced near the top.

DSC_4393A wooden pavilion was built across the cove from Furepe Falls as a lookout.

IMG_8828Despite the sun was out at Furepe Falls, clouds and mist continued to cover most of Shiretoko Mountain Range.

IMG_8831We slowly walked back to Shiretoko Nature Centre.

IMG_8850Back at Shiretoko Village Guesthouse, we had another tasty dinner after a pleasant bath at the inhouse onsen.  That evening, we were served with local salmon ruibe.  It had a delicate texture and would melt in the mouth.

IMG_6480Each of us was served with lamb nabe, herring with sea urchin miso, dried flounder, butter scallops, steamed razor clams, etc.

IMG_6487(Foreground) Ruibe, translates as “melted food”, is half-frozen sashimi. It is an Ainu culinary specialty from Hokkaido.  Fresh fish was traditionally stored under snow during winter and eaten without defrost.   (Background) Kichiji is a local fish with red skin and big eyes.  We tasted the deep dried kichiji which was crispy and delicious.

IMG_6488Steamed razor clams were full of aroma of local sake.