ultramarinus – beyond the sea

Amman, Jerash & Dead Sea

DEAD SEA, near Madaba, Jordan

2006.05.18.

We arrived at Madaba by a morning bus from Amman.  Madaba was a decent sized city during the Byzantine era.  Today the town is frequented by tourists enroute to the Dead Sea.  There are a number of archaeological sites still under excavation in Madaba.  What makes tourists (including us) to stop by Madaba is a 6th century mosaic map depicting the Holy Land of Jerusalem at the Greek Orthodox Church Saint George.  We stopped by the archaeological museum briefly to see other pieces of mosaic from the Byzantine era, before heading over to Saint George.  The church was packed with tourists, all crowded around the mosaic map of the Biblical World.  The mosaic map centered around Jerusalem, with other towns and geographical features such as River Nile, Mediterranean Sea, and Dead Sea, in the surrounding.

After checking out the mosaic map, it was time to get a dip in the salty water of the Dead Sea to get a taste of the floating experience.  After some bargaining, we hopped onto a taxi for the Jordanian Dead Sea beaches.  From Madaba, our taxi sped through the rough arid landscape towards the waterfront.  Along the way, the driver pointed towards the Moses Spring at Mount Nebo and Moses Memorial Church as we passed by the holy sites. At the waterfront, we entered a whole new world of luxury resort hotels.  The contrast to what we have seen in other parts of Jordan and Syria was phenomenal.  We knew we had arrived at the touristy Dead Sea coast. Our driver dropped us off at Amman Beach Resort.  We paid 4 Jordanian Dinar admission for entering the beach.  We took our turns swimming in the water.  Just for fun, we grabbed a bit of mud and apply it onto our skin, tried the unique floating experience, and took a few typical Dead Sea photos.  It was hot and humid at the world’s lowest point 422m below sea level.

As many researchers point out, the Dead Sea is in deep trouble, as less water from Jordan River is feeding the salty inland lake every year.  Syria, Jordan, Palestine, and Israel all rely on the area’s limited water resources, such as the Jordan River, for their growing population and agriculture usage.  In matter of decades the Dead Sea may disappear altogether.  We heard that the Jordanian government is planning to divert the water from the Red Sea to feed the Dead Sea.  At the beach, we could clearly see traces of the old water level.  Just like seeing the retreating glacier on the Swiss Alps, witnessing the gradual death of the Dead Sea made a huge impact on me.  People in the developed nations may never have to worry about their water supply, and understand the alarming situation of the Dead Sea. Sustainable water management in the Dead Sea area is crucial, not only to the survival of millions, but also to the political climate of the region. Successful cooperation of water management offers the basis of peaceful co-existence of the region’s major players.  If that fails, dispute fighting over water supply may not be too far away.

800px-Madaba_mapThe magnificent 6th century mosaic map of Jerusalem is the biggest draw for tourists coming to Madaba.  (Image: Public Domain)

road from dead sea to madabaIt was hard to imagine where grazing of the sheep could take place in the arid landscape near the Dead Sea.

06ME35-01The arid landscape at Dead Sea is actually susceptible to flash floods.

near dead seaThe Jordan Rift Valley is a long depression between Israel, Jordan and Palestine.  The valley’s lowest spot is the lowest point in the world, located in the Dead Sea at 790m below sea level.

06ME34-35Despite touristy, we amused ourselves in the salty water of the Dead Sea.


AMMAN CITADEL & CHAMPIONS LEAGUE, Amman, Jordan

2006.05.17.

For thousands of years since Neolithic times, the ā€œLā€ shaped hill known as the Citadel of Amman has been inhabited.  Ruined temples, churches and palaces dated from the Roman, Byzantine and Umayyad period stand on the citadel hill today.  Most of the site remains unexcavated, despite archaeologists have been working here since 1920.  The most impressive remain on the hill is the ruins of Temple of Hercules, a Islamic palace and a modest archaeological museum, in which parts of the Dead Sea Scrolls are on display.  After dropping off our dirty clothes at a laundry shop, getting ourselves some stamps at the post office, and having a peek at the 2nd century Roman Theatre through the metal gate, we turned to the Citadel hill.  On the hill, we chatted with a group of cheerful girls who were playing on the street.  They spotted us from afar and seemed pretty curious about the three of us.  One of them spoke to us in simple English, and we ended up taking pictures with them in the midst of innocent laughter.

In the evening, we had dinner at a restaurant with a large balcony overlooking a busy street.  After dinner, I had a short break at the hostel before returning to the restaurant that we had supper to watch the 2006 UEFA Champions League final on their live TV.  There were 15 local men in the tiny restaurant watching the game.  I sat down at an empty chair behind a man and ordered a bottle of coke.  The large balcony window was opened and I could hear the noise and cheer from restaurants and tea shops down below.  It felt like everyone in the city was watching the game.  Almost all the other men in the restaurant were smoking cigarette or shisha (water pipe), and the place got pretty smoky.  When Campbell scored the first goal for Arsenal, the restaurant owner came out and teased all of us.  He yelled at me saying “Barca finishes, Arsenal good!”  Throughout the game, the men around me kept on sneaking out to the balcony and yelled down to people on the street.  I wasn’t sure whether they knew each other or they were just too excited about the game.  Assisted by Henrik Larsson, at around 76th minutes Samuel Eto finally scored the first goal for Barca, and then the second came 5 minutes later through Juliano Belletti.  It was the perfect night for the Barca supporters in Amman.  As I walked back to the hotel, I passed by groups after groups of joyful locals coming out from tea shops and restaurants after watching the game.  Some were walking home in laughter, while the others hopping on cars that packed both sides of the street.

06ME34-07The first impression of Jordan was clean and pleasant.

vernacular architectureAmman is a popular Arab city for international visitors.  It also receives the most medical tourists in the region.

06ME34-14Locals that we met in Jordan were all very welcoming and friendly.

citadel 1At the Citadel, the uncompleted 2nd century Temple of Hercules was the most prominent Roman structure.  Probably destroyed by earthquakes, it once housed a 12m stone statue of Hercules.

06ME34-19Lying mostly in ruins at the Citadel, the Umayyad Palace was built in the 8th century.

Umayyad PalaceA new dome was restored at the entrance hall of Umayyad Palace in 1998, though not all experts have agreed on whether there was truly a dome in the old times.

06ME34-16Looking down from the Citadel we could get a good view of the Roman Theatre.

roman theatreSituated at the foot of Jabal Al-Joufah opposite to the Citadel, The 2nd century Roman theatre could seat 6000 people.

06ME34-21The Raghadan Flagpole was once the tallest in the world. It is visible from allover the capital city.

big flagAs of 2015, the 126.8m Raghadan Flagpole is the 7th tallest in the world.  It flies a 60 x 30m flag.

ammanMainly cladded with limestone or sandstone, residential buildings in Amman are limited to 4 storeys above ground.

children on the hill 1At the Citadel hill, we stumbled upon a group of cheerful children.

children on the hill 2The young girls were quite curious about us.

children on the hill 3Amman is considered to be one of the most liberal cities in the Arab world.  Many children have been exposed to the global commercialism since very young age.

children on the hill 4One of the girls tried speaking to us in simple English.

06ME34-24I passed by Al-Husseini Mosque on our way to supper.  Erected in around 640 AD, Al-Husseini Mosque was one of the oldest mosques in Amman.  The structure was rebuilt in 1932 by King Abdullah I.


JERASH, near Amman, Jordan

2006.05.17.

After a rather heavy-hearted account of a brief stay in Syria, we move on to the next part of the Middle East journey: Jordan.  Although small and almost landlocked, Jordan is a country of a relatively high development with an “upper middle income” economy in the region.  It is also a major tourist destination, thanks to the ruined city of Petra, Dead Sea and Wadi Rum, the desert of Lawrence of Arabia.  After a little more than a week in Syria, my first impression of the Jordanian capital Amman was the reemergence of global businesses and commercialism.  We started our Jordanian route from the very north of the country at Jerash, one of the best preserved classical ruined cities in the world.

* * *

In the morning we took a minibus from Amman’s Abdali Bus Station (now closed) to Jerash, about 50km north of the capital.  Known as the City of Gerasa or Antioch on the Golden River in the Greco-Roman period, Jerash is now a major tourist attraction in Jordan.  Many have compared Jerash to Pompeii in terms of the extent and level of preservation.  To me, they are actually two very different archaeological sites.  Founded by Alexander the Great or by Seleucid King Antioch IV in 331 BC, Gerasa flourished in the Roman period as a trading hub.  The three of us entered the Arch of Hadrian, wandered around the site and visited the ruins of Temple of Artemis, saw many Corinthian columns, early churches, the Oval Piazza, and two theaters.  At the second theatre, a band of musicians, dressed in military uniforms, were playing ceremonial music on the stage and prompting us to stop for a while.  We exited the ruins through the north gate, and hired a taxi to the bus station.  At the station, we met an old man who claimed to be an experience tour guide.  He told us a bit about his journey to Hong Kong back in early 1970’s, and recommended a cheaper Amman bound bus to us.

Hadrian GateThe 22m high triple archway was erected in 130AD to commemorate the visit of Roman Emperor Hadrian.

oval squareThe Oval Forum and Cardo Maximus, the colonnaded road are the most recognizable features of Jerash.

06ME33-31 The Oval Forum is bounded by 56 Ionic columns.  The large square was probably used as a marketplace and a social gathering spot.

06ME33-18With the beautiful scaenae frons (stage backdrop) and proscenium (front face of the stage), the South Theatre is another popular attraction in Jerash.

06ME33-20Built between AD 81 and 96, the 5000-seat South Theatre is famous for its acoustics.

performers 1Just like many other tourists, we came across a band playing Jordanian Scottish bagpipe at the South Theatre of Jerash.

06ME33-21The Jordanian Scottish bagpipe is a legacy from Emirate of Transjordan, the years of British protectorate before 1946.

06ME33-34Artemis was the patron saint of Gerasa.  Built in the 2nd century AD, the Temple of Artemis was one of the most important building in the city, at least before the end of the 4th century when pagan cults were forbidden.

06ME33-37Temple of Artemis has several beautiful Corinthian columns.

06ME34-02Each column weighs over 20 tons and are 39 feet tall.

06ME34-04Built in AD 165, the North Theatre was used for government meetings in the Roman times. Many seats are inscribed with names of city council members.