ultramarinus – beyond the sea

Latest

MOUNT MASHU TRAIL (摩周岳) , Teshikaga (弟子屈), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.19

Day 5 (2/3).

After a few hours of sleep, we returned to Lake Mashu to seek for another way to enjoy the crater lake and its surrounding landscape.  This time, we took the 14.4km trail along the crater rim up to the top of Mount Mashu or Mashu-dake (857m) in a 4-6 hour walk.  We read from guidebooks and online research that the scenery of Lake Mashu from the top of Mount Mashu would be very promising.  At the onsen village of Mashu, we stopped by a bento takeout restaurant (ほかほか弁当) to order two rice dishes for breakfast, then headed over to Lake Mashu’s Viewpoint 1 to begin our hike.

IMG_9435A terrain model at the visitor centre of Viewpoint 1 gave us a rough idea of the hike, from the trailhead at the south of the crater lake to the peak of Mount Mashu east of the lake.

IMG_9437Soon after the trailhead, we reached the first open lookout of Lake Mashu.

DSC_5431The trail took us along the crater lake on one side, and open plains and distant volcanic landscape on the other.

DSC_5445Most of the trail ran along the rim of the crater lake with little shades.

IMG_9439From time to time, wooden signage indicated how far we were from our destination.

DSC_5456There was pretty much only one trail for most of the time.  It was almost impossible to get lost.

DSC_5477Near the peak, we could fully appreciate the volcanic landscape of the area, including the lush green forest in a caldera next to Lake Mashu.

DSC_5464After the steepest section of the trail, we finally reached the summit of Mount Mashu, a small lookout that offered wonderful panoramas of the area’s volcanic scenery.

IMG_9471From the top, the volcanic scenery of Lake Mashu area was fantastic.

DSC_5474Looking west, the ridge of Mount Mashu led to the eastern edge of Lake Mashu.

IMG_9483Clouds were getting in with the wind but we still had blue sky for most of the day.

IMG_9488Looking north, we could see the eastern tip of Lake Mashu.

DSC_5504With a circumference of about 20km, Lake Mashu is one of the most famous lakes in Hokkaido.  We stayed for 20 minutes or so at the summit all by ourselves, and began the descending journey when another couple followed our footsteps and replaced us at the peak.

DSC_5512Claimed as the clearest water in the world, the beautiful blue colour of Lake Mashu was simply stunning when viewed from above.

DSC_5523The wind was mild and the air was dry, such a perfect day for us to hike at Eastern Hokkaido.

DSC_5527From afar, the tiny island in the middle of Lake Mashu looked funny.

DSC_5529The hike would offer a different scenery if we were to visit in the autumn.

IMG_9512The beauty of Lake Mashu never cease to impress us, despite we were a little tired near the end of the hike.

DSC_5540Finally back to Viewpoint 1, the colour of Lake Mashu had changed due to the constantly moving clouds.  From dawn to mid afternoon, we had fully experienced the sheer beauty of the famous caldera lake.  After about 5 hours of walking, we returned to Viewpoint 1 and treated ourselves with local chocolate milk and a slide of Yubari melon (夕張メロン) , the king of Hokkaido fruit which just broke the record in May 2019 with a pair fetching 5,000,000 JPY (47,000 USD) in auction.

 

Advertisements

SUNRISE AT LAKE MASHU (摩周湖), Teshikaga (弟子屈), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.19

Day 5 (1/3).

Leaving Shitetoko behind, we drove southwest towards another natural marvel of Eastern Hokkaido, the Akan Mashu National Park (阿寒摩周国立公園).  On the lush green plains, stratovolcanoes emerged from the horizon, revealing the violent past of the local geology.  Hot springs, crater lakes, and stratovolcanoes define the characteristics of the area, and have led to the creation of the national park in 1934.  Just 15 minutes of drive from the Viewing Platform 1 of Lake Mashu (摩周湖), we checked in at Masyuko Youth Hostel (摩周湖ユースホステル).  That night, we woke up at 2:30am and drove to the Viewing Platform 1 of Lake Mashu to watch the sunrise, a famous scenic sight in Hokkaido.  In the summer, the sun rises at around 3:30am in Hokkaido, leaving us little time for sleep.

IMG_9287On our way to Akan Mashu National Park , we could see stratovolcanoes rose from the horizon in a distance.

DSC_5272Masyuko Youth Hostel offered us a comfortable place for a short rest before venturing out again to watch the sunrise.

DSC_5275Arriving at Viewing Platform 1 of Lake Mashu, we were stunned to see a sea of clouds blanketed over the area of Kawayu Onsen (川湯温泉).

DSC_5278Looking down from Viewing Platform 1, the water of Lake Mashu appeared like a crystal clear mirror.

DSC_5282Claimed as the clearest lake in the world (with transparency measured at 41.6m back in 1931), Lake Mashu is a beautiful crater lake where visitors can enjoy the scenery from two viewing platforms along the crater rim.  The clarity might have slightly declined in recent decades, but Lake Mashu is still nevertheless an extremely beautiful water body.

DSC_5284Occasionally sea of clouds would appear over Lake Mashu, but not during our visit.

DSC_5316Soon the sun emerged behind the distant mountains to the east.

IMG_9343We enjoyed moments of tranquility at the viewing platform.

IMG_9346Several tourists and photographers stood among us at the viewing platform to watch the sunrise.

DSC_5340While the sun gradually rose over the crater lake, the moon still lingered in the sky behind us.

DSC_5358When the sun was up, the blue water and lush green surroundings changed the ambience of Lake Mashu into a different picture.

DSC_5365The deep blue Mashu Lake looked mysterious and surreal, almost too beautiful to be true.

DSC_5366The rim of the crater lake is now covered by dense vegetation.

DSC_5374 On the other side, clouds and fog continued to cover the foot of Mount Iō (アトサヌプリ) and the Kawayu Onsen (川湯温泉) area.

DSC_5378The entire Kawayu Onsen (川湯温泉) area was blanked in thick fog.

DSC_5380Over to the southwest we could see the stratovolcanoes near what could be the Lake Akan area.

DSC_5402Down in Lake Mashu, the small island stood like a feature sculpture at the centre.

DSC_5424The sea of clouds at Mount Iō (アトサヌプリ) and Kawayu Onsen (川湯温泉) subsided a little as the sun rose further up.

IMG_9426Moisture and thin mist emerged over the water of Lake Mashu.  The mist moved rapidly over the water as if dancing.  At one point thicker mist gathered over the small island like a cotton shield.

DSC_5426The mist over the island soon dispersed into thin air.  As the sun reached high in the sky, we returned to the hostel for another few hours of sleep before coming back to Lake Mashu for hiking later in the day.

 

FANTASTIC ORCAS, Nemuro Strait (根室海峡), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.18

Day 4 (2/2).

Whale watching was the final act of our Shiretoko experience.  The 2-hour outing in the Nemuro Strait turned out to be one of the biggest highlights of our trip.  Located at the eastern coast of Shiretoko Peninsula, Rausu is the most popular spot in Japan for whale watching.  Depending on the season, various kinds of whales might be found in the waters just off Rausu, including minke whales, sperm whales, orcas (killer whales), humpback whales (rare), Dall’s porpoises, giant beaked whales, and several types of dolphins.  In the summer months, there would be a good chance to spot Orcas, also known as killer whales.  Orca is the biggest member of the oceanic dolphin family.   They are highly social animals that hunt and wander the sea in pods.

After three days of poor weather, the strong wind and rough sea had finally died down despite the overcast condition over Nemuro Strait.  Returned from Shiretoko Pass, we went immediately to the office of Gojiraiwa Kanko Eco Tour (ゴジラ岩観光) in Rausu to make our cruise payment, get a quick snack near the tourist office, parked our car at the dock, and followed one the three queues to get on our cruise boat.

IMG_6759After three days of stormy weather, the sea was calm as we were about to set sail for the whale watching cruise.

IMG_9249Looking back towards the dock, we could see Mount Rausu rising beyond the village of Rausu.

DSC_4649After seeing several black dorsal fin dolphins popped out of the sea in the first ten minutes, our boat captain received the news that orcas had been spotted by the other cruise boats ahead of us.  Soon we reached cruise boats and had our first encounter with the magnificent orcas of Nemuro Strait.

DSC_4668.JPGWhile the whales roam in the water of Nemuro Strait, Stellar Sea Eagles and White Tailed Eagles rule the sky.

DSC_4688Lies between Hokkaido’s Shiretoko Peninsula and the controversial Russian Kunashir Island (国後島), Nemuro Strait is one of the best place in the world for whale watching.

DSC_4724Orcas often appear in a pod.  We were fortunate to follow a pod of around a dozen of orcas, even with a few juveniles.

DSC_4733Sometimes, the pod would get pretty close to one of the cruise boats.

DSC_4874Eventually, the pod of orcas broke up into a few smaller groups.  Our boat followed one of the groups towards the direction of Rausu.

DSC_4949Each boat followed a different group of orca.

DSC_4990Seeing one of the juvenile killer whales in the pod was very exciting.

DSC_5042.JPGIn a few moments, the whales swam really close to our boat.

DSC_5052A few of them even swam under our boat.

DSC_5064From a close distance, we could truly appreciate the true scale of the orca’s dosal fin.

DSC_5098Some scientists can identify different orcas just by studying their distinctive dorsal fins.

DSC_5146For most of the time, our boat continued to follow a small group of orcas.

DSC_5152_01It was the first whale watching cruise that we ever experienced.  We were grateful that the cruise turned out to be a fruitful one.

DSC_5204After about 1.5 hour chasing the whales, it was time for our boat to return to the dock.

DSC_5210The majestic Mount Rausu signified our arrival of the village of Rausu.

DSC_5237Most fishing boats were parked behind the sea wall at the dock.

DSC_5247It seemed that most fishermen were staying away from the sea for another day.  Whale watching offered us the perfect finale to for our Shiretoko journey.  We picked up our car at the dock, had another seafood lunch at Jun no Banya (純の番屋), and left Shiretoko altogether for our next destination: Mashu Lake.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MOUNT RAUSU (羅臼岳), Shiretoko Peninsula (知床半島), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.18

Day 4 (1/2).

It was the fourth day since we arrived in Shiretoko.  Finally we woke up to a fine morning.  Clouds gathered atop the Shiretoko Mountain Range northwest of Rausu.  We had made reservations for an afternoon whale watching cruise.  Our plan for the morning was to head up to Shiretoko Pass, and do a bit of hiking near Rausu Lake.  It would be quite unfortunate if we were to leave Shiretoko without seeing Mount Rausu (羅臼岳).

At 1661m in height, Mount Rausu is an active stratovolcano that sits above Shiretoko Pass, the highest point on Road 334 between the villages of Utoro and Rausu.  Also known as the Fuji of Shiretoko, Mount Rausu is one of Japan’s 100 Famous Mountains.  Hiking up the volcano takes 6-8 hours round trip, but given our limited time and lack of snow crampons, we would have to leave the hike for another time.

IMG_9085Driving Road 334 up to Shiretoko Pass, we could see the mountains were still covered in clouds.

IMG_9111On our way up, we passed by several covered road sections.

DSC_4457It was a disappointment again when we arrived at Shiretoko Pass (知床峠) and saw Mount Rausu covered in thick clouds.

IMG_9122Though the weather looked quite promising down at coast of Rausu.  We hoped that the fine weather would stay for several more hours so that we could embark on our whale watching cruise in the afternoon.

DSC_4480It was 2.3km from Shiretoko Pass to the trailhead of Lake Rausu Trail.  About five minutes after we walked down the road from the parking lot of Shiretoko Pass, the clouds began to disperse over Mount Rausu.  We could finally see the beautiful volcano right behind us.

DSC_4497Some hikers would prefer taking the bus to cover the 2.3km journey to the trailhead, but there are only four buses per day on the route.

DSC_4495Looking down from the trailhead, the trail began at a marsh area.

DSC_4498We followed a narrow path down to the trailhead of Rausu Lake Trail.

IMG_9146The return trip of Rausu Lake Trail would take about 3-4 hours.  Unfortunately our time was restricted by the afternoon whale watching cruise.  We decided to do a shorter hike by turning back at Marsh 3.

DSC_4528As warned at the trailhead, the early section of the Rausu Lake Trail was flooded like a swamp.  Rubber boots could be rented at the Rausu Visitor Centre.

DSC_4525We soon reached Marsh 2 after a short walk in the flooded path, but there wasn’t much water in the marsh.

IMG_9148Snow was still visible at certain parts of the trail.

DSC_4502After about half an hour from the trailhead, we reached Marsh 3, the destination of our short hike.

DSC_4505Mount Rausu and its reflection at Marsh 3 was the biggest highlight of the hike.  While most hikers would continue on towards Rausu Lake, we had to turn back in order to make back to Rausu on time for our whale watching cruise.

IMG_9170Back to Shiretoko Pass, more clouds were visible over Nemuro Strait and the Russian controlled Kunashir Island.  We were a little worried about the overcast conditions ahead of our whale watching cruise.  After 2.5 days of rainy weather, even few patches of clouds would make us nervous.

 

 

JUN NO BANYA (純の番屋), Rausu (羅臼), Shiretoko Peninsula (知床半島), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.17

Day 3 (2/2).

Written by Hokkaido playwright Sô Kuramoto (倉本聰), Kita no Kuni Kara 2002 Yuigon (北の国から 遺言) is the final chapter of Kita no Kuni Kara (北の国から), a popular television drama series about a father and his daughter who moved to Hokkaido from Tokyo after divorcing his wife.  The series and its special episodes were first broadcasted in 1981, and ended in 2002 with Kita no Kuni Kara 2002 Yuigon.  Throughout the years, Kita no Kuni Kara and other stories written by Sô Kuramoto have become part of the cultural identity of Hokkaido, while his efforts of promoting Hokkaido have made places like Furano to become well known tourist attractions nowadays.

In Rausu, a seaside timber house that appears in Kita no Kuni Kara 2002 Yuigon has been rebuilt and converted into a lovely seafood restaurant Jun no Banya (純の番屋).  Ran by several local ladies, Jun no Banya serves fantastic local seafood.  During our two-day stay in Rausu, we had two delightful seafood meals at Jun no Banya that ranked among the top highlights in our Shiretoko experience.

IMG_9273Jun no Banya is a popular seafood restaurant housed in a rebuilt timber house that appeared in Kita no Kuni Kara 2002 Yuigon (北の国から 遺言).

DSC_4431The Jun no Banya is managed by several local ladies.

DSC_5255The interior of Jun no Banya is full of colours.

IMG_8977Outside the window, the sea looked calm and relaxing.

IMG_8991We ordered some local seafood after checking out the seafood display in the fridge.

IMG_9277Many decorations in Jun no Banya reveal the restaurant’s strong connection to the fishing industry.

DSC_4433Many Japanese glass fishing floats were handmade with recycled glass from sake bottles.

DSC_4438A cute little lantern.

DSC_5258Dried fish are also used as decorations.

DSC_5265A series of colourful lanterns lined along a timber beam of the house.

DSC_5266A poster in the restaurant reminded us that Shiretoko had been inscribed in UNESCO’s World Heritage sites since 2005.

IMG_9267Uni (sea urchin) and kani (crab) on sushi rice is definitely a signature dish of Shiretoko.

IMG_9268Super fresh sashimi from the area was another delight.

IMG_9270Shrimps from the nearby waters and oysters from Akkeshi Bay (厚岸) let us experience the true sweetness of fresh seafood from clean and cold seawater.

IMG_8995Located beside Rausu Shiretoko Tourist Information Centre, the Rausu Fisherman Store (羅臼(漁協)直営店 海鮮工房) offers wonderful souvenirs including the famous Rausu kelp and local salmon made from this remote fisherman village.

IMG_8997 A map in the tourist information centre explains the main highlights of Shiretoko and the northeast coast of the peninsula.

IMG_9005At the tourist centre, we tried out the light blue ice-cream inspired by the famous Abashiri (網走) Ryuhyo or drift ice.

IMG_9007Outside the tourist centre, we quietly looked at the sea across the street, hoping the sea would calm down and the sun would come out the next morning.

 

 

RUSA FIELD HOUSE (ルサフィールドハウス), Rausu (羅臼), Shiretoko Peninsula (知床半島), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.17

Day 3 (1/2).

We woke up to another stormy morning in Utoro.  For the morning, we had seats reserved for a 3-hour Cape Shiretoko Boat Cruise to the eastern tip of Shiretoko Peninsula.  Due to strong winds and heavy rain, not a single boat was allowed out in the sea that day.  We had no choice but decided to leave Utoro earlier than planned, and crossed the Shiretoko Mountain Range to Rausu (羅臼) on the east coast of the peninsula.  On our way, we passed by Shiretoko Pass, the highest point between Utoro and Rausu where we could see the full view of Mount Rausu if the sky was clear.  Unfortunately, all we saw was rain, fog, fallen branches and flying leaves in the air.  Beyond Shiretoko Pass, we gradually descended to Rausu, the remote fishing village which also served as the eastern entry point of the Shiretoko National Park.  The rain began to cease as we approached Rausu.  With extra time to spare in Rausu, we decided to check out Rusa Field House, the interpretation centre providing information on the famous residents of the Nemuro Strait: whales and dolphins.

IMG_8897We quickly put all our luggage in the car and left Utoro under stormy weather.  We followed the Tran-Shiretoko Highway 334 heading towards Rausu via Shiretoko Pass.

IMG_8908As expected, we couldn’t see the mountain scenery along the way.  Instead, we drove cautiously on the winding Highway 334 under heavy rain.

DSC_4398Blocked by Shiretoko Mountain Range, Rausu was actually pretty dry, though the wind was strong and waves were high.

DSC_4409High waves had also prevented any boats sailing out to the sea from Rausu.

IMG_6526Though we could at least step out of the car to enjoy the coastal scenery.

IMG_8928Near the end of coastal Road 87, we reached the Rusa Field House.  It was very windy at the field house where strong wind from the Shiretoko Mountains channeled through the Rusa River Valley to the river mouth right by the Field House.

IMG_8930The Rusa Field House is a pleasant timber building facing the sea.

IMG_6543The Rusa Field House has a special focus on the wildlife at Shiretoko.

IMG_6550The upper mezzanine offers visitors binoculars and telescopes for whale spotting in the sea.

IMG_6557This beautiful map  of Shiretoko Peninsula in the Field House caught our attention. Although we couldn’t understand Japanese, we thought the map was showing two routes (winter and summer) over the mountains connecting Rausu and Utoro to the northwest.

IMG_6558While one side of the Field House overlooks the sea, the other side faces the Rusa River Valley that goes all the way up the mountains to Shiretoko Pass.  In the building, we could feel the strong wind from the mountains sweeping through the valley out to the sea.

IMG_6577Standing at a column base, the taxidermy of an Ezo Red Fox reminded us that red fox is a common sight in Shiretoko.

IMG_8939The Field House also showcases what is probably the most famous product from Rausu: the Rausu Kelp, one of the three most precious kelp in Hokkaido.

IMG_8940A hand-drawn illustration that shows the hidden connections between the life cycle of local salmon and coastal ecosystem of Shiretoko.

IMG_8943The Field House provides visitors information on current weather and coastal conditions of the area.  We could see the warning of high waves along the shore, urging people not to visit the coastal outdoor hot springs.  We decided to give up our plan of visiting the outdoor baths of Aidomari Onsen (相泊温泉) near the end of Road 87.

DSC_4413After visiting the Field House, we drove to the fishing village of Rausu.  At Rausu, the weather seemed fine and the sea pretty calm.  We spent quite a bit of time searching for a place to sample the fabulous local seafood.

IMG_8967In the afternoon, we checked in at our onsen hotel Rausu no Yado Marumi Ryokan (羅臼の宿 まるみ).  In the lobby, we were greeted by some of the most iconic animals of Shiretoko: Sperm Whale and Brown Bear.

IMG_8961Our guestroom offered fantastic panorama of the sea.

IMG_9018The dinner at Rausu no Yado Marumi Ryokan (羅臼の宿 まるみ) was probably the most satisfying hotel dinner of our Hokkaido stay.  Other than the “compulsory” seafood on our table as shown in the photo above, there were also a wide range of dishes made with local seafood and vegetables served in a buffet.

IMG_9067From our room, the sea looked peaceful and beautiful in late afternoon.  We silently wished for fine weather in the next day when we would have our last chance to sail out to the sea before leaving Shiretoko.

 

 

FUREPE FALLS (フレペの滝), Shiretoko Peninsula (知床半島), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.16

Day 2 (3/3).

The weather fluctuated throughout the afternoon.  After lunch, we headed back up to Shiretoko National Park from Utoro to check out Shiretoko Nature Centre, the visitor centre near the park entrance.  The centre houses a large screen theatre showing films of the park, service counters for hikers to obtain trail information, a cafe serving excellent coffee and ice-cream, and a shop selling all kinds of outdoor outfits and souvenir.  After watching a film about a family of Ezo Red Fox at the theatre, we decided to do a short hike.

IMG_6477Only 20 minute of easy walk would bring us to coast of Sea of Okhotsk, where the The Virgin’s Tears or the Furepe Waterfall awaited us.

DSC_4374In the past few decades, efforts had been made to reforest the area after years of pioneer development.

DSC_4382Weather was changing quickly.  At one moment, clouds and mist were moving away from the Shiretoko Mountain Range.

DSC_4383At Furepe Falls, we could only admire the cliff of the waterfall from the opposite side.

DSC_4385A small group of seabirds gathered at the tip of the rock cliff.

DSC_4389From the opposite side, we could see the top part of the Furepe Falls.  The waterfall originates from ground water surfaced near the top.

DSC_4393A wooden pavilion was built across the cove from Furepe Falls as a lookout.

IMG_8828Despite the sun was out at Furepe Falls, clouds and mist continued to cover most of Shiretoko Mountain Range.

IMG_8831We slowly walked back to Shiretoko Nature Centre.

IMG_8850Back at Shiretoko Village Guesthouse, we had another tasty dinner after a pleasant bath at the inhouse onsen.  That evening, we were served with local salmon ruibe.  It had a delicate texture and would melt in the mouth.

IMG_6480Each of us was served with lamb nabe, herring with sea urchin miso, dried flounder, butter scallops, steamed razor clams, etc.

IMG_6487(Foreground) Ruibe, translates as “melted food”, is half-frozen sashimi. It is an Ainu culinary specialty from Hokkaido.  Fresh fish was traditionally stored under snow during winter and eaten without defrost.   (Background) Kichiji is a local fish with red skin and big eyes.  We tasted the deep dried kichiji which was crispy and delicious.

IMG_6488Steamed razor clams were full of aroma of local sake.