ultramarinus – beyond the sea

Posts tagged “Causeway Bay

TAI HANG FIRE DRAGON, Hong Kong (Part 2 of 2)

The fire dragon dance happened over three consecutive nights in the Tai Hang neighborhood.  On the night of the Mid Autumn Festival, and the second night of Tai Hang Fire Dragon celebration, the performance would take place in both Tai Hang and Victoria Park, where the annual lantern festival was held.  After the fire dragon performers left Tai Hang for Victoria Park, the residents and local business owners in Tai Hang continued their celebration by taking over the streets in small groups, doing barbecue, having a few rounds of beer, playing with glow sticks and lanterns, and mingling with neighbors and new acquaintances under the flickering candle light.

In the Victoria Park, visitors packed the football fields to attend the lantern festival, taking photos in front of the large lantern displays.  At the other side of the park, families, children, couples and friends gathered in small groups on the grass field, having picnic, playing with lanterns, and marveling at this year’s super full moon (tradition of Mid Autumn Festival since ancient times).

1After the fire dragon dance was over in Tai Hang, Wun Sha Street, the main street in the neighborhood, was left quiet again.

2Community celebrations continued on the laneways after the fire dragon left Tai Hang.

3Barbecue was popular for celebrating the Mid Autumn Festival among local businesses in Tai Hang.

4In the good old days, playing with candles and paper lanterns on the street was popular among kids.

5The street became a secret garden for kids playing with their colourful glow sticks.

6Adults and kids had different ways celebrating the Mid-Autumn Festival.

7This ice-cream store offered special mooncake flavour ice-cream.

8At the entrance to the Fire Dragon Path was a large sign for celebrating the 136th Tai Hang Fire Dragon Festival.  The Fire Dragon Path connects Tai Hang with the Victoria Park.

9A full moon rose between clouds over Fire Dragon Path.

10The festive Lantern Festival at Victoria Park included large lanterns and a fair selling traditional snacks and local crafts.

11When the fire dragon dance entered Victoria Park, the lights dimmed and all eyes were at the dragon performance.

12Traditional red lanterns were hung over the football fields of the Victoria Park.

13Many large lanterns were on display at the lantern festival, and this one made by traditional craftsman was the centerpiece of the show.

14Families and friends gathered on the grass field,

15Illuminating a paper lantern is wonderful way to celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival.

16Everyone had their own design for their little moon viewing spot.

17Despite the fact that there were thousands of people celebrating together on the green field, there was a sense of tranquility in the dark embraced by the soft light from candles and colourful glow lights.

18Across the street from Victoria Park, the traditional signage of Tai Hang’s Fire Dragon Dance Festival reminded everyone that the dance would be held again the following night.

Advertisements

TAI HANG FIRE DRAGON, Hong Kong (Part 1 of 2)

Every year during the Mid Autumn Festival, three consecutive nights of fire dragon dance illuminates the streets of Tai Hang, a residential neighborhood near the shopping and entertainment district of Causeway Bay.  For 136 years, the fire dragon dance has been an annual local ritual since 1880, originating at a time when Tai Hang was a Hakka fishing village.  Local legend has it that there was a year when Tai Hang was hit by typhoon and plague.  In order to tackle the plague, a soothsayer suggested to organize the fire dragon dance for three nights during the Mid Autumn Festival.  The villagers did what was told.  After the dance, the plague miraculously receded.  Since then, the fire dragon dance has continued year after year into modern days, and gradually evolved into a renowned event organized by the Tai Hang Residents’ Welfare Association, attracting spectators from all over the city.

1The fire dragon dance is mainly performed on Wun Sha Street (the main street in Tai Hang), and paraded through a number of streets and lanes in the neighborhood, including Lily Street where the historical Lily Temple (Lin Fa Kung -蓮花宮) is located.

3Back on Wun Sha Street where the centre stage of the dance is held, different groups of performers in traditional costumes gather in unique formations for the various scenes in the fire dragon dance.

4 Dance performers include local children and elderly.

6The main performers are undoubtedly the hundreds of Tai Hang boys, who hold up the 67m dragon.

13Made of 32 segments of dried weed and burning incenses, the fire dragon presents a rare glimpse of authentic heritage in the contemporary urban context of Hong Kong.

16Leading by the two dragon balls, one of the main focus of the fire dragon dance is the dragon head.

9Led by the dragon head, the dance performs throughout the upper and lower sections of Wun Sha Street for over an hour.

7Dragon dancers run up and down the 200m+ Wun Sha Street, rhythmically swinging the dragon body under the beat of the Chinese drum.

5The dragon dance is a collective endeavour that involves sweat and muscles of Tai Hang boys.

20While the dancers parade the dragon, hundreds of spectators and photographers gather along Wun Sha Street competing for a good spot.

10Towards the end of the dance, performers carry the dragon back to the mouth of Wun Sha Street, where they perform the dragon coil one last time.

12The dancers gradually move the dragon body to form a circular coil, symbolizing unity and harmony of the community.

15The entire dragon dance includes a combination of quick and slow moves. Under moments of quick drum beats, the fire dragon appears dancing up and down in mid air.

18The rhythmic dragon dance is directed by the Traditional Chinese drum music squad.

17Before the end of the dance, all performers, including the children in traditional costumes, parade through Wun Sha Street once again greeting farewell to the spectators.

11After the farewell greetings, the dancers perform a few minutes of “encore” performance.

19At the end, dancers pull out the incenses from the back of the dragon and give them out to spectators as souvenirs.


LUNAR NEW YEAR FAIR, Victoria Park, Hong Kong

Going to a flower fair (花市) or new year fair (年宵) on the Lunar New Year’s Eve is a common tradition in Hong Kong.  Among all flower fairs in the city, the one at Victoria Park 維園 in Causeway Bay is the biggest and busiest.   Nowadays, all sorts of merchandises are being sold in the flower fair, from fresh flowers to traditional snacks, classic New Year’s gifts to trendy toys, and just about anything that may make one laugh.  Never mind the crowd.  The later it gets into the night the more fairgoers flock into the park.  It’s the joyful atmosphere, the sense of participation and the feel of being jammed in the mass that draws friends, families and couples to visit the fair every year.  It is the prelude of Spring holiday, and the biggest party in Hong Kong to welcome the lunar new year. 2Floral colour was the first thing that caught the eyes of fairgoers when entering the park. 1Peach blossom has always been the most iconic flower of the Chinese New Year. 3Other than peach, water narcissus, pussy willows, lilies, and orchids were among people’s favorites. 4 New Year Fruits might look funny but its golden colour made it a delightful New Year’s decoration at home. 5Shoppers often compared prices and the qualities of flowers from one vendor to another. 6Traditional snacks and sweets attracted both tourists and local visitors. 7 The fair get much busier as the clock edged closer to midnight. 8aIn recent years, the Lunar New Year’s Fair at Victoria Park has become a testing ground for young entrepreneurs and amateur designers, many of whom are students from universities or secondary schools. 9aStuff toy and cushions are common in the fair. 10Young vendors make their best effort to capture fairgoers’ attention. 11Popular slang in Cantonese inspired a whole lot of fair merchandises. 12Some vendors positioned themselves in the middle of the aisle to advertise their booths. 13To stand out among the vendors was not an easy task. 14Among all the new merchandise this year, the cola-like stuff toys with trendy slogans made the news by walking the thin ice of copyright infringement. 15Other than young vendors, many politicians and political parties also had booths set up in the fair.  Some politicians made new year couplets as free gifts for supporters. 16Satirical merchandises targeting the chief executive of Hong Kong CY Leung could be found throughout the fair. 17Merchandise related to the Umbrella Movement (Occupy Central) reminded us the delicate political situation of Hong Kong in recent months. 18Other politically charged merchandise include the inflated fence (related to the protests of Umbrella Movement) and the thick toast (related to a recent conflict between the locals and visitors from Mainland China). 19Many merchandise reflected a considerable level of disapproval of the current government.  Nonetheless, most fairgoers did put aside their political differences and anguish in order to enjoy a night of joy. 20The fair at Victoria Park lasted until dawn of the Lunar New Year’s Day.