ultramarinus – beyond the sea

Posts tagged “wetland

MOUNT RAUSU (羅臼岳), Shiretoko Peninsula (知床半島), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.18

Day 4 (1/2).

It was the fourth day since we arrived in Shiretoko.  Finally we woke up to a fine morning.  Clouds gathered atop the Shiretoko Mountain Range northwest of Rausu.  We had made reservations for an afternoon whale watching cruise.  Our plan for the morning was to head up to Shiretoko Pass, and do a bit of hiking near Rausu Lake.  It would be quite unfortunate if we were to leave Shiretoko without seeing Mount Rausu (羅臼岳).

At 1661m in height, Mount Rausu is an active stratovolcano that sits above Shiretoko Pass, the highest point on Road 334 between the villages of Utoro and Rausu.  Also known as the Fuji of Shiretoko, Mount Rausu is one of Japan’s 100 Famous Mountains.  Hiking up the volcano takes 6-8 hours round trip, but given our limited time and lack of snow crampons, we would have to leave the hike for another time.

IMG_9085Driving Road 334 up to Shiretoko Pass, we could see the mountains were still covered in clouds.

IMG_9111On our way up, we passed by several covered road sections.

DSC_4457It was a disappointment again when we arrived at Shiretoko Pass (知床峠) and saw Mount Rausu covered in thick clouds.

IMG_9122Though the weather looked quite promising down at coast of Rausu.  We hoped that the fine weather would stay for several more hours so that we could embark on our whale watching cruise in the afternoon.

DSC_4480It was 2.3km from Shiretoko Pass to the trailhead of Lake Rausu Trail.  About five minutes after we walked down the road from the parking lot of Shiretoko Pass, the clouds began to disperse over Mount Rausu.  We could finally see the beautiful volcano right behind us.

DSC_4497Some hikers would prefer taking the bus to cover the 2.3km journey to the trailhead, but there are only four buses per day on the route.

DSC_4495Looking down from the trailhead, the trail began at a marsh area.

DSC_4498We followed a narrow path down to the trailhead of Rausu Lake Trail.

IMG_9146The return trip of Rausu Lake Trail would take about 3-4 hours.  Unfortunately our time was restricted by the afternoon whale watching cruise.  We decided to do a shorter hike by turning back at Marsh 3.

DSC_4528As warned at the trailhead, the early section of the Rausu Lake Trail was flooded like a swamp.  Rubber boots could be rented at the Rausu Visitor Centre.

DSC_4525We soon reached Marsh 2 after a short walk in the flooded path, but there wasn’t much water in the marsh.

IMG_9148Snow was still visible at certain parts of the trail.

DSC_4502After about half an hour from the trailhead, we reached Marsh 3, the destination of our short hike.

DSC_4505Mount Rausu and its reflection at Marsh 3 was the biggest highlight of the hike.  While most hikers would continue on towards Rausu Lake, we had to turn back in order to make back to Rausu on time for our whale watching cruise.

IMG_9170Back to Shiretoko Pass, more clouds were visible over Nemuro Strait and the Russian controlled Kunashir Island.  We were a little worried about the overcast conditions ahead of our whale watching cruise.  After 2.5 days of rainy weather, even few patches of clouds would make us nervous.

 

 

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DAY 4 (1/3): TAISHO POND (大正池), Kamikochi (上高地), Nagano Prefecture (長野県), Japan, 2018.05.28

Kamikochi Valley and Hida Mountains or Northern Japanese Alps are the results from a series of geological processes that began 2.6 million years ago, when the Azusa River carved out a deep valley while the adjacent mountains rose abruptly.  Further volcanic and sedimentary activities continued to transform the Kamikochi Valley until recently.  Nowhere can illustrate the dramatic transformations of Kamikochi more evidently than the Taishoike or Taisho Pond (大正池), when the eruption of Mount Yake (焼岳) in 1915 dammed the Azusa River to form the beautiful Taisho Pond.  Today, the tranquil turquoise pond right by the foot of Mount Yake has become the most popular destination in Kamikochi.

After two nights at Kamikochi, it was time for us to move on to Shirahone Onsen for a dip in its famous milky hotspring.  Before leaving Kamikochi by the 8:25am bus, we opted for our last hike to visit Taisho Pond before breakfast. We headed out at 5am.  The sky was grey compared to our previous two days.

DSC_6669Time was still early and the sun had yet risen beyond the mountains, though the air was fresh and filled with a sense of tranquility.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe trail to Taisho Pond soon led us into a forest.  Bear sighting was an unlikely possibility.  The last time someone saw a bear in the area was three weeks prior to our visit.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe trail led us passing through some wet and shaded forest area before reaching a wetland right by Azusa River.

DSC_6683It took us about 45 minutes to reach the Taisho Pond.  Mount Yake (焼岳), the volcano whose eruption in 1915 caused the formation of the famous pond, stood right behind the turquoise water.

DSC_6688Unfortunately, the sky was grey and the early sunlight was still weak.  The colour of Taisho Pond was not as vivid as we hoped.

DSC_6699Nonetheless, the peaceful scenery and the pleasant colour palette of Taisho Pond still looked magnificent.

DSC_6702The beautiful reflections on the mirror like water revealed how peaceful the Taisho Pond was.

DSC_6722Taisho Pond is the ideal place to admire the scenery of Mount Yake.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERATaisho Pond seemed to provide a desirable habitat for wild ducks.

DSC_6738Fallen logs in the water dated back to the last eruption of Mount Yake.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAA long boardwalk provides convenient access to the lookout of Taisho Pond.

DSC_6746On our return journey to Nishi-Itoya Mountain Lodge, we passed by a lush green wetland.

DSC_6747A small detour from the main path led us to the picturesque Tashiro Pond (田代池), a peaceful wetland with crystal clear water.

DSC_6762Along the way, we passed by a stubborn duck that refused to step aside from the middle of the main path.

DSC_6790Back to Nishi-itoya Mountains Lodge we had a close encounter with two Japanese macaque monkeys.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAfter two hours of hiking, we felt total satisfied for devouring the fantastic breakfast.

IMG_8232After two nights of delightful stay, it was time for us to check out of Nishi-itoya Mountain Lodge.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe made it just in time to catch the 8:25am bus to Sawando (沢渡) where we would make a transfer for Shirahone Onsen (白骨温泉).

* * *

CHUBU (中部地方) 2018, Japan, 2018.05.25 – 06.03
Introduction

Day 1: Tokyo (東京)
1.1 TSUKIJI OUTER MARKET (築地場外市場)
1.2 TSUKIJI INNER MARKET (築地中央卸売市場)
1.3 MORI ART MUSEUM (森美術館), 21_21 DESIGN SIGHT & CAFE KITSUNE

Day 2: Matsumoto (松本)& Kamikochi (上高地)
2.1 MATSUMOTO CASTLE (松本城), Matsumoto (松本)
2.2 “ALL ABOUT MY LOVE”, Yayoi Kusama’s Exhibition at Matsumoto City Museum of Art (松本市美術館), Matsumoto (松本)
2.3 MATSUMOTO PERFORMING ARTS CENTER (まつもと市民芸術館), Matsumoto (松本)
2.4 FROM MATSUMOTO (松本) TO KAMIKOCHI (上高地)
2.5 ARRIVAL IN KAMIKOCHI (上高地), Chūbu-Sangaku National Park (中部山岳国立公園)

Day 3: Kamikochi (上高地)
3.1 MORNING WALK IN KAMIKOCHI (上高地), Nagano Prefecture (長野県)
3.2 DAKESAWA HIKE (岳沢), Kamikochi (上高地)

Day 4: Kamikochi (上高地) & Shirahone Onsen (白骨温泉)
4.1 TAISHO POND (大正池), Kamikochi (上高地)
4.2 RETREAT IN THE JAPANESE ALPS, Shirahone Onsen (白骨温泉)
4.3 MOMENTS OF ESCAPE, Tsuruya Ryokan (つるや旅館), Shirahone Onsen (白骨温泉)

Day 5: Hida-Takayama (飛騨高山)
5.1 CITY IN THE MOUNTAINS, Hida-Takayama (飛騨高山)
5.2 HIDA BEEF (飛騨牛), Hida-Takayama (飛騨高山)
5.3 SAKE (日本酒) BREWERIES, Hida-Takayama (飛騨高山)
5.4 YOSHIJIMA HOUSE (吉島家住宅), Hida-Takayama (飛騨高山)
5.5 HIGASHIYAMA WALKING COURSE (東山遊歩道), Hida-Takayama (飛騨高山)

Day 6: Hida-Takayama (飛騨高山), Shirakawa-go (白川郷) & Ainokura (相倉)
6.1 MIYAGAWA MORNING MARKET (宮川朝市), Hida-Takayama (飛騨高山), Gifu Prefecture (岐阜県)
6.2 OGIMACHI IN THE RAIN, Shirakawa-go (白川郷), Gifu Prefecture (岐阜県)
6.3 SOBA, TEMPLE & LOOKOUT, Shirakawa-go (白川郷)
6.4 RAINY AFTERNOON IN AINOKURA (相倉), Gokayama (五箇山)
6.5 GASSHO MINSHUKU, FLOWER BEDS & RICE PADDY FIELDS, Ainokura (相倉), Gokayama (五箇山)
6.6 CROAKING FROGS AND MOONLIGHT REFLECTIONS, Gokayama (五箇山)

Day 7: Kanazawa (金沢)
7.1 DEPARTURE IN THE RAIN, Ainokura (相倉) to Kanazawa (金沢)
7.2 A SEAFOOD PARADISE – OMICHO MARKET (近江町市場)
7.3 D T Suzuki Museum (鈴木大拙館)
7.4 Kenroku-en Garden (兼六園)
7.5 Oyama Shrine (尾山神社) and Nagamachi Samurai District (長町)
7.6 Nomura Samurai House (武家屋敷跡 野村家), Nagamachi Samurai District (長町)
7.7 Sushi Ippei (一平鮨), Katamachi (片町)

Day 8: Kanazawa, Ishikawa Prefecture (金沢, 石川県)
8.1 Iki Iki Tei (いきいき亭) and Higashide Coffee (東出珈琲店), Omicho Market (近江町市場)
8.2 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art (21世紀美術館)
8.3 Kazuemachi District (主計町茶屋街)
8.4 Higashi Chaya District (東山ひがし茶屋街)
8.5 Kaga Yuzen Toro Nagashi (加賀友禅燈ろう流し), Asano River (浅野川)
8.6 AFTERMATH OF KAGA YUZEN TORO NAGASHI (加賀友禅燈ろう流し)

Day 9 & 10: Tokyo (東京)
9.1 Marunouchi (丸の内) & Nihonbashi (日本橋)
10.1 OEDO ANTIQUE MARKET (大江戸骨董市), Tokyo Forum (東京国際フォーラム)
10.2 FARMER’S MARKET, United Nations University (東京国連大学), Aoyama (青山)


AN UNDISTURBED WATER WORLD, Nam Sang Wai (南生圍), Hong Kong

Known as the “backyard” of Hong Kong, Nam Sang Wai (南生圍) is an area of tranquil wetlands north of Yuen Long (元朗).  The “Wai” in “Nam Sang Wai” refers to “gei wai” (基圍), an old method mainly for shrimp culture introduced to Hong Kong in the 1940’s. Bounded by man made embankments, gei wai is a shallow pool in a mangrove wetland with 10 to 30 cm of water collected from the Deep Bay (后海灣).   The shrimp farmer would use a water gate to control the amount of incoming water from Deep Bay.  The sea water would also bring in juvenile fish and shrimps.  The shrimps would  then feed on the organic matters from the mangroves.  Gei wai shrimps (基圍蝦), usually steamed, has became a local delicacy throughout the years.  The gei wai method has been mostly phased out nowadays.   The former gei wai pools and fish ponds of Nam Sang Wai have became a semi-manmade wetland where visitors enjoy the serene waterways, reed clusters and pockets of grasslands, and learn more the wetland ecosystem.  It also offers a network of pleasant footpaths winding through waterways and pools, providing the perfect venue for an afternoon stroll, wedding photos, and even filming set for movies, TV shows and music videos.

DSC_1900The passenger boat at Shan Pui River (山貝河) is the last public passenger boat service in Hong Kong operated entirely by hand.

DSC_1902The first impression of Nam Sang Wai for most visitors is its overwhelming serenity of water networks.

DSC_1908The footpaths at Nam Sang Wai are lined with beautiful Red Gum Trees (赤桉樹).

DSC_1911Some old houses in Nam Sang Wai are abandoned, and are sometimes used for filming local movies.

DSC_1918The boardwalk by the old fish ponds are popular spots for photos.

DSC_1937The large lawn at Nam Sang Wai is equally popular for couples, families and pets to hang out.

DSC_1944Nam Sang Wai is a hotspot for both migrating birds and local waterfowls.

DSC_1956Beyond Shan Pui River (山貝河), the urban and industrial developments of Yuan Long seem like they may one day encroach into the wetland territories.

DSC_1981The peaceful water of Nam Sang Wai remains like a flawless mirror.

DSC_1987As a natural system to purify the surface runoff of the city, wetlands are essential in the entire water cycle of the city.

DSC_2002As villagers move out of the rural areas, some old stores and houses in Nam Sang Wai are gradually crumbling into ruins.

DSC_2009A handful of occupied houses remain in Nam Sang Wai.

DSC_2010Though most of them are in need of restoration.

DSC_2020Like pets in other rural areas of Hong Kong, the cats and dogs in Nam Sang Wai also lead peaceful lives.

DSC_2033_01A number of village homes built on stilts can be founded along Shan Pui River (山貝河).

DSC_2031Such serene and picturesque setting are great for photography and sketches.

DSC_2027After a long and relaxing stroll in Nam Sang Wai, the small man-powered boat at Nam Sang Wai Pier is always around to bring visitors back to the city’s side.


Hong Kong Wetland Park (香港濕地公園), Tin Shui Wai (天水圍), Hong Kong

Just a stone throw away from Lau Fau Shan, to the north of Tin Shui Wai New Town (天水圍) stands the 61-hectare Hong Kong Wetland Park (香港濕地公園).  Created as an ecological mitigation area to compensate for the loss of wetland in the new town construction, the Wetland Park is doubled as a tourist attraction with facilities including recreated wetland reserve for waterbirds and other wildlife, boardwalk circuits over the mudflats to offer a close encounter with the wetland habitats, and a visitor centre hosting exhibitions on wetland’s biodiversity.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAKnown as the “Succession Walk”, an elevated winding boardwalk takes visitors out to the water pond to closely appreciate various types of aquatic plants.

DSC_5245Different types of waterlilies are some of the highlights of “Succession Walk”.

DSC_5234At “Wetland at Work”, visitors can learn more about the crops produced from wetlands, such as the rice from rice paddies.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFollowing the boardwalk deeper into the park, visitor arrives at the “Mangrove Boardwalk”.

DSC_5317At “Mangrove Boardwalk”, there is a good chance to have close encounter with some of the inhabitants of the wetland mudflats, such as the Bluespotted Mudskipper and Common Mudskipper.

DSC_5316Able to breathe through their skin, these amphibious fish are quite active on the mud, actively skipping around to defend their territories.  Staying in mud burrows allow them to keep moist and maintain their body temperature.

DSC_5378-2Another type of common inhabitant at the mudflats is the Fiddler Crab.  The male uses its small claw to feed and the big claw to defend.

DSC_5398Little Egret are common in Hong Kong, and can be seen in all seasons at the Wetland Park.

DSC_5418The boardwalk of Wildside Walk takes visitors to the far end of the park, where a few types of tranquil pools await both the visitors and dragonflies.

DSC_5433At some pools, algae completely covers the water like a soft green carpet.

DSC_5444The pattern on the algae looks like an abstract painting.

DSC_5458After a loop of the wetland reserve, one can return to the modernist Visitor Centre for further information.  The building is one of the few in Hong Kong extensively using exposed architectural concrete.

IMG_0842The lobby where visitors arrive is always busy.

DSC_5460One of the exhibit highlights is Pui Pui, a Salt Water Crocodile caught at Shan Pui River in 2003 when it was a juvenile.  It is believes that Pui Pui was an abandoned illegal pet from the area that had grown too big to handle.  Hong Kong Wetland Park became Pui Pui’s permanent home in 2006.

DSC_5503Other wetland wildlife on display includes freshwater fish.

DSC_5515Looking out of the Visitor Centre, one can fully appreciate the extent of the wetland reserve, a common type of ecosystem that once dominated large areas of Northern New Territories.

DSC_5522The modernist concrete architecture matches well with the peaceful landscape of the wetlands.

DSC_5525It is pleasant to appreciate the serene wetlands from the upper level of the Visitor Centre before leaving.

 


SUNSET OVER OYSTER WATERS, Lau Fau Shan (流浮山), Hong Kong

For 700 years, oysters have been farmed in the water of Deep Bay/ Shenzhen Bay (后海灣) near the sleepy village of Lau Fau Shan (流浮山).  Situated in the Pearl River Estuary where fresh water constantly enters the bay, Deep Bay/ Shenzhen Bay is a perfect site for oyster farming.  Today, Lau Fau Shan is the last remaining site in Hong Kong that oyster cultivation still exists.  Generations of oysters and oyster sauce consumption have put these molluscs an important part of cultural heritage of, not just Lau Fau Shan villagers, but Hong Kong citizens in general.  In fact, the oyster species cultivated in Lau Fau Shan is known as Crassostrea hongkongensis, which is named after the city itself.  Oyster farming has gone through a gradual decline since 1980’s, partly due to climate change, ocean acidification and deterioration of local water quality, and partly due to stronger competition of foreign oysters in the local market in recent years.  Apart from oysters, Lau Fau Shan is also best known for its seafood restaurants and the romantic sunset over the tidal flats.  Standing by the waterfront, the Hong Kong-Shenzhen Western Corridor (深港西部通道) or Shenzhen Bay Bridge and the myriad of highrise constructions over at the Shenzhen side stretch along the horizon, while on the Deep Bay’s southern shore in the sleepy village of Lau Fau Shan, time seems to have stood still in the past few decades.

DSC_0442Coming all the way to the northwest corner of Hong Kong, we entered the village of Lau Fau Shan and immediately stopped by a small eatery by the main street.  Trying the fried or grilled oyster at one of the several simple eateries offers a pleasant alternative to the more upscale seafood restaurants along Lau Fau Shan Main Street.

DSC_0451The special attraction of Lau Fau Shan is indisputably the oysters.

DSC_0454Similar to Sai Kung and Lei Yue Mun, Lau Fau Shan is also well known of its seafood restaurants.

DSC_0456Some seafood restaurants look quite traditional and casual.

DSC_0463There are a few shops in Lau Fau Shan specialized in making oyster sauce.  Inevitably oyster sauce has became one of the most popular souvenir of the village.

DSC_0467Along the main street, two workers were busy opening the harvested oysters for sale.

DSC_0481Along the main street, different types of dried seafood were sold.

DSC_0477Near the waterfront, containers and air tubes for live seafood lie all over a temporary covered area.

DSC_0510The waterfront of Lau Fau Shan was covered with oyster shells.

DSC_0501Many boats just lay on mud flats during low tide.

DSC_0490At the waterfront, the shallow water over the mud flats looked like a peaceful mirror.  Beyond the Deep Bay stood the silhouette of another metropolis of Southern China, Shenzhen.

DSC_0587From a fishing village before 1980 to today’s metropolis of over 10 million inhabitants, the emergence of Shenzhen is a miracle to many.

DSC_0593While we took pictures of mud flats and Deep Bay, a cyclist emerged from nowhere and stopped for a moment at the waterfront.  Beyond lay the 5.5km Hong Kong-Shenzhen Western Corridor (深港西部通道), or the Shenzhen Bay Bridge (深圳灣公路大橋) linking the two cities at the Deep Bay since 2007.

DSC_0614The sun finally appeared behind the clouds, casting an orange tint to the drying seafood by the shore.

DSC_0621In late afternoon, more boats returned from Deep Bay.  Some boats arrived at the pier and offloaded passengers who might have spent the entire day fishing in the bay.

DSC_0695The silhouette of Hong Kong Shenzhen Western Corridor (深港西部通道) or Shenzhen Bay Bridge (深圳灣公路大橋) stood out along the western horizon under the late afternoon sun.

DSC_0744Soon enough, the sun made its daily routine down to the horizon beyond the bridge.

DSC_0759As the sun lowered to the horizon, the tide had also quietly returned to the waterfront of Lau Fau Shan.

DSC_0784_01The moon was already up above Lau Fau Shan.  Most tourists had left except a few passionate photographers refusing to leave the waterfront despite the sun was fading fast.

DSC_0794As we left the waterfront of Lau Fau Shan, the lights from the opposite shore began to lit up one by one.


WHEN MOOSE MEETS BEAVER, Algonquin, Ontario, Canada (3/3)

The sky was grey and the air was moist when we first hiked the Mizzy Lake Trail in 2007.  After seeing a wild turkey dashing across our path, we followed the trail to an open area surrounded by spruce bogs. The trail cut right through the bogs, with peaceful ponds lying along both sides. It was 7:30 in the morning and we were all by ourselves. Soon we discovered footprints on the muddy path, some probably belonged to a fox, and some were hoof prints of a much larger animal.  We continued to walk forward until we saw a dozen or so bare spruce trunks sticking out from the water.  Reflection of their white trunks stood against the grey clouds in the tranquil water was occasionally disrupted by touches of water insects.  Somehow the imagery touched us like a gentle poem.  We looked at the scenery for a while and took some photos.  As we turned our head back onto the trail, we immediately spotted something tall standing ahead.  It had its back towards us, but soon it turned its head and looked right into our eyes.  It was a tall cow moose, our first ever sighting of a moose.  It stared at us for half a minute, then walked slowly down to the spruce bog on the left, crossed the water to the opposite shore, and disappeared into the spruce forest beyond.  Moose, the largest animal in the deer family, is popular for wildlife sighting in North America.  The English name “moose” is a word borrowed from the Algonquian language back in the 17th century.   Spreading their two large toes to keep them from sinking, moose has adapted well living in the environment of spruce bogs, where they can walk on the peat filled marshland to feed on aquatic plants.

We saw beavers several times in Algonquin.  Sometimes with sticks in their mouth, sometimes without, always in quick motion swimming across the water.  But more often, we saw traces of their existence: pointed tree stumps, trunks with bite marks, mud and timber dams, and mounts of timber sticks in the pond.  Back in the 17th century, when a large area of North America was owned by the Hudson Bay Company, beaver fur was one of the major exports from the New World.  Nowadays, beaver has become a national emblem for Canada, appearing on the symbol and coat of arms of many organizations, companies and government departments, from Toronto Police to Canadian Pacific Railway, and has officially designated as the national animal in 1975.  In Algonquin, beavers are probably the only animals other than humans that know how to alter a natural environment to create their desirable home.  As the second largest rodent, beavers use their large teeth to harvest timber.  Along with stones and mud, beavers use the timber to construct dams to alter stream flow in order to create wetlands known as the beaver ponds.  A peaceful beaver pond contains water warmer than running streams, an ideal habitat for many wetland plants, frogs and fish.  It also serves as a moat for the beaver lodge to prevent wolves and other predators.  The longest beaver dam in record exists in Alberta, reaching up to 850m in length.

Spruce bogs and beaver ponds are two of the five major habitats found in the Algonquin Park.  The other three includes the coniferous forest, deciduous forest, and rivers and lakes.  Spruce bog is a type of wetland common in the north.  Its water is quite acidic and full of floating vegetation that slowly accumulates into a thick layer of peat.  Many birds frequent the bog,  and so as moose which come to feed and drink.   Beaver pond, on the other hand, belongs to the story of beavers continuously transforming the natural environment by building dams and ponds, creating a wetland that benefits many species and also serves as a natural filtration and stormwater system for the area.  A pond may last until the death of a beaver, or until a fierce storm hits and damages the dam beyond repair.  By then, nature will restore the area back to its original conditions, until the arrival of the next beaver to restart the cycle all over again.

00Moose sighting is popular on Highway 60, especially in early spring when the animals gather at the highway ditches to indulge  in a feast of road salt from melted snow.

1The coniferous forest (ie. spruce) and deciduous forest (ie. maple) are two of the five major types of habitat in Algonquin.

07AL02-03Rivers and lakes represent another major habitat in the park.

2Reflection of autumn foliage in a beaver pond.

3BA small beaver dam made of timber, rocks and mud is a highlight at the Beaver Pond Trail.

4Many species, such as some waterlilies, frogs and birds, thrive in the ecosystem of a beaver pond.

5Spruce bog is the other major habitat at Algonquin.

6Life and death of spruce trees mark the boundary of a spruce bog.

8Reflection of spruce forest in the bog water.

07AL03-05Spruce bog near our moose sighting location in early morning (First visit of Mizzy Lake Trail in 2007).

7Remnants of once a thriving spruce grove at the spruce bog near our moose sighting location in late afternoon (Third visit of Mizzy Lake Trail in 2012).

9Spruce bog near our moose sighting location in late afternoon (Third visit of Mizzy Lake Trail in 2012).

DSC_2160Young moose shook off water after crossing a small stream (Third visit of Mizzy Lake Trail in 2012).  That afternoon, we joked with each other and placed our bet on whether we would have the same moose encounter that we had five years ago. We waited patiently and dusk was approaching. When we were about to leave, we spotted this young moose. It was truly a magical moment for both of us.

11Young moose gazed upon us curiously (Third visit of Mizzy Lake Trail in 2012)..

12This curious young moose walked from the wetland onto the trail. It seemed to be interested in us as it was slowly walking towards us.  The cow moose that we encountered five years earlier at the same spot reacted differently. It walked away from us into forest after it made an eye contact with us.    (Third visit of Mizzy Lake Trail in 2012).

DSC_2202-2_01Bull and cow moose kept their eyes on the young moose while the young moose fixed its eyes upon us. We have vivid memory of each encounter with moose at Algonquin Park. The encounter becomes special and personal as each time there were only the moose and us. Every time, when we spotted the animal, we would keep our voice low and keep a distance from them as we didn’t want to disrupt or irritate them.  (Third visit of Mizzy Lake Trail in 2012).

13After we had some good moments of moose encounter, we got to rush out of the Mizzy Lake Trail before dusk fell. We walked so fast that we were like racing with the sun. We’ll keep this peaceful image of Algonquin Park with us in mind no matter where we go.

* * *

Read other posts on Parks of Southern Ontario
1.1 Land of Water and Forest, Algonquin Park, Ontario ( 1 of 3)
1.2 A Tale of Rocks and Maples, Algonquin, Ontario ( 2 of 3)
1.3 When Moose Meets Beaver, Algonquin, Ontario, (3/3)
2. Ancient Reef and Escarpment, Bruce Peninsula, Ontario
3. Algonquin Legend and Mazinaw Pictographs, Bon Echo Provincial Park, Ontario


LAND OF WATER AND FOREST, Algonquin Park, Ontario, Canada (1/3)

From now on, not only will we continue to write about our current travel experiences, we are also going to revisit some of our past adventures and share them on the blog.  We hope that Blue Lapis Road will become a more comprehensive collection of our magnificent moments in life, at which we opened our hearts to see, listen and feel the world around us.  Before winter creeps in, we grew a little nostalgic here and decided to write about the Algonquin Provincial Park in Canada, a place that we frequented a few years ago for its vivid autumn colours, pristine bog scenery, elusive wildlife, and the sense of escape from busy urban life.

Located about 300km north of Toronto and 260km west of Ottawa, Algonquin has long been a tourist destination in the Province of Ontario since late 19th century.  Today, visitors go to Algonquin for all kinds of outdoor activities, including canoeing, camping, fishing, hiking, cross-country skiing, wildlife watching, horseback riding, mountain biking, etc.  Established as a provincial park since 1893, Algonquin has remained as a 7,600+ sq.km natural paradise in a transitional zone between northern coniferous and southern deciduous forests.  With over 2,400 lakes and 1,200km of waterways, Algonquin is truly a splendid land of waters and forests.

At dawn, the vivid skies project crystal clear reflections in the cold and tranquil water of Algonquin.  The rising mist and silhouette of spruce forest mark the distant horizon, separating the sky and the peaceful water.  Waterlilies float in the water like tiny brush strokes of an oil painting.  The sound of water made by the sudden movement of frogs, fishes or beavers occasionally break the silence.  As the sun rises, the vivid colour palette of the Canadian landscape emerges while the frost on timber boardwalk slowly disappears.  The haunting beauty of Algonquin’s misty landscape is so powerful that it lured us to get up early in the morning and ventured out there in freezing temperature with our cameras every time we visited the park.  The same dramatic scenery has touched the heart of many visitors, including famous painter Tom Thomson back in the 1910s, when he decided to move into the park to paint and lead a life of solitude after a few visits in 1912.  He resided in the park for five years and finished some of his most important works before drowning to death at Canoe Lake in Algonquin.

2Spruce Bog, a wetland system with accumulating peat and decaying moss, is a common scene in Algonquin.

3In many cases, spruce bog is submerged in water a few metres deep.

4Dawn at Spruce Bog Boardwalk in Algonquin Park.

5The Spruce Bog Boardwalk is a 1.5 km loop trail easily accessible from Hwy 60.

6Mist rises from the mirror-like lake in early morning.

7Much of the soil in Algonquin is saturated with water, allowing bogs and lakes to flourish.

8Early morning canoeing is popular in Algonquin.

9When driving along Hwy 60, the misty spruce bogs appear as occasional openings between dense woodlands.

10Perfect reflection of an utility pole in bog water.

11Dense spruce forest and peaceful misty water at Lake of Two Rivers in Algonquin.

12Vivid fall foliage at Lake of Two Rivers won’t disappoint any visitor.

13The peak moments for the fall colours are almost over.

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Read other posts on Parks of Southern Ontario
1.1 Land of Water and Forest, Algonquin Park, Ontario ( 1 of 3)
1.2 A Tale of Rocks and Maples, Algonquin, Ontario ( 2 of 3)
1.3 When Moose Meets Beaver, Algonquin, Ontario, (3/3)
2. Ancient Reef and Escarpment, Bruce Peninsula, Ontario
3. Algonquin Legend and Mazinaw Pictographs, Bon Echo Provincial Park, Ontario