ultramarinus – beyond the sea

Posts tagged “water

MOUNT MASHU TRAIL (摩周岳) , Teshikaga (弟子屈), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.19

Day 5 (2/3).

After a few hours of sleep, we returned to Lake Mashu to seek for another way to enjoy the crater lake and its surrounding landscape.  This time, we took the 14.4km trail along the crater rim up to the top of Mount Mashu or Mashu-dake (857m) in a 4-6 hour walk.  We read from guidebooks and online research that the scenery of Lake Mashu from the top of Mount Mashu would be very promising.  At the onsen village of Mashu, we stopped by a bento takeout restaurant (ほかほか弁当) to order two rice dishes for breakfast, then headed over to Lake Mashu’s Viewpoint 1 to begin our hike.

IMG_9435A terrain model at the visitor centre of Viewpoint 1 gave us a rough idea of the hike, from the trailhead at the south of the crater lake to the peak of Mount Mashu east of the lake.

IMG_9437Soon after the trailhead, we reached the first open lookout of Lake Mashu.

DSC_5431The trail took us along the crater lake on one side, and open plains and distant volcanic landscape on the other.

DSC_5445Most of the trail ran along the rim of the crater lake with little shades.

IMG_9439From time to time, wooden signage indicated how far we were from our destination.

DSC_5456There was pretty much only one trail for most of the time.  It was almost impossible to get lost.

DSC_5477Near the peak, we could fully appreciate the volcanic landscape of the area, including the lush green forest in a caldera next to Lake Mashu.

DSC_5464After the steepest section of the trail, we finally reached the summit of Mount Mashu, a small lookout that offered wonderful panoramas of the area’s volcanic scenery.

IMG_9471From the top, the volcanic scenery of Lake Mashu area was fantastic.

DSC_5474Looking west, the ridge of Mount Mashu led to the eastern edge of Lake Mashu.

IMG_9483Clouds were getting in with the wind but we still had blue sky for most of the day.

IMG_9488Looking north, we could see the eastern tip of Lake Mashu.

DSC_5504With a circumference of about 20km, Lake Mashu is one of the most famous lakes in Hokkaido.  We stayed for 20 minutes or so at the summit all by ourselves, and began the descending journey when another couple followed our footsteps and replaced us at the peak.

DSC_5512Claimed as the clearest water in the world, the beautiful blue colour of Lake Mashu was simply stunning when viewed from above.

DSC_5523The wind was mild and the air was dry, such a perfect day for us to hike at Eastern Hokkaido.

DSC_5527From afar, the tiny island in the middle of Lake Mashu looked funny.

DSC_5529The hike would offer a different scenery if we were to visit in the autumn.

IMG_9512The beauty of Lake Mashu never cease to impress us, despite we were a little tired near the end of the hike.

DSC_5540Finally back to Viewpoint 1, the colour of Lake Mashu had changed due to the constantly moving clouds.  From dawn to mid afternoon, we had fully experienced the sheer beauty of the famous caldera lake.  After about 5 hours of walking, we returned to Viewpoint 1 and treated ourselves with local chocolate milk and a slide of Yubari melon (夕張メロン) , the king of Hokkaido fruit which just broke the record in May 2019 with a pair fetching 5,000,000 JPY (47,000 USD) in auction.

 

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SUNRISE AT LAKE MASHU (摩周湖), Teshikaga (弟子屈), Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, 2019.06.19

Day 5 (1/3).

Leaving Shitetoko behind, we drove southwest towards another natural marvel of Eastern Hokkaido, the Akan Mashu National Park (阿寒摩周国立公園).  On the lush green plains, stratovolcanoes emerged from the horizon, revealing the violent past of the local geology.  Hot springs, crater lakes, and stratovolcanoes define the characteristics of the area, and have led to the creation of the national park in 1934.  Just 15 minutes of drive from the Viewing Platform 1 of Lake Mashu (摩周湖), we checked in at Masyuko Youth Hostel (摩周湖ユースホステル).  That night, we woke up at 2:30am and drove to the Viewing Platform 1 of Lake Mashu to watch the sunrise, a famous scenic sight in Hokkaido.  In the summer, the sun rises at around 3:30am in Hokkaido, leaving us little time for sleep.

IMG_9287On our way to Akan Mashu National Park , we could see stratovolcanoes rose from the horizon in a distance.

DSC_5272Masyuko Youth Hostel offered us a comfortable place for a short rest before venturing out again to watch the sunrise.

DSC_5275Arriving at Viewing Platform 1 of Lake Mashu, we were stunned to see a sea of clouds blanketed over the area of Kawayu Onsen (川湯温泉).

DSC_5278Looking down from Viewing Platform 1, the water of Lake Mashu appeared like a crystal clear mirror.

DSC_5282Claimed as the clearest lake in the world (with transparency measured at 41.6m back in 1931), Lake Mashu is a beautiful crater lake where visitors can enjoy the scenery from two viewing platforms along the crater rim.  The clarity might have slightly declined in recent decades, but Lake Mashu is still nevertheless an extremely beautiful water body.

DSC_5284Occasionally sea of clouds would appear over Lake Mashu, but not during our visit.

DSC_5316Soon the sun emerged behind the distant mountains to the east.

IMG_9343We enjoyed moments of tranquility at the viewing platform.

IMG_9346Several tourists and photographers stood among us at the viewing platform to watch the sunrise.

DSC_5340While the sun gradually rose over the crater lake, the moon still lingered in the sky behind us.

DSC_5358When the sun was up, the blue water and lush green surroundings changed the ambience of Lake Mashu into a different picture.

DSC_5365The deep blue Mashu Lake looked mysterious and surreal, almost too beautiful to be true.

DSC_5366The rim of the crater lake is now covered by dense vegetation.

DSC_5374 On the other side, clouds and fog continued to cover the foot of Mount Iō (アトサヌプリ) and the Kawayu Onsen (川湯温泉) area.

DSC_5378The entire Kawayu Onsen (川湯温泉) area was blanked in thick fog.

DSC_5380Over to the southwest we could see the stratovolcanoes near what could be the Lake Akan area.

DSC_5402Down in Lake Mashu, the small island stood like a feature sculpture at the centre.

DSC_5424The sea of clouds at Mount Iō (アトサヌプリ) and Kawayu Onsen (川湯温泉) subsided a little as the sun rose further up.

IMG_9426Moisture and thin mist emerged over the water of Lake Mashu.  The mist moved rapidly over the water as if dancing.  At one point thicker mist gathered over the small island like a cotton shield.

DSC_5426The mist over the island soon dispersed into thin air.  As the sun reached high in the sky, we returned to the hostel for another few hours of sleep before coming back to Lake Mashu for hiking later in the day.

 


HOKKAIDO ROAD TRIP, Hokkaido (北海道), Japan, June 15-25, 2019

Tsuyu (梅雨), the rain season, begins to hit Okinawa in May and gradually makes its way north to the rest of Japan until the end of June.  During the wet season, rainy and cloudy weather affects the entire country except Hokkaido, Japan’s second largest island north of the main Honshu Island.  The seismic active island is 3.6% smaller than Ireland, with a climate significantly cooler than the rest of Japan.  Seeking for a pleasant getaway from Hong Kong’s humid and hot summer, we picked Hokkaido as the destination for our 11-day vacation from 15th to 25th of June.  Traveling in the remote national parks and rural countryside of Hokkaido, hiring a car was a necessity.  The Hokkaido journey was our first road trip in Japan.

Known as Japan’s last true wilderness, Shiretoko National Park (知床国立公園) is the natural haven where Brown Bears and Blakiston Fish Owls ruled the primeval forests and Orcas, Minke and Sperm Whales roamed the waters of Nemuro Strait.  With fantastic natural scenery, wildlife and seafood to offer, this easternmost part of Hokkaido topped our priority list in the travel itinerary.  Next in the journey took us to the spectacular volcanoes of Akan Mashu National Park (阿寒摩周国立公園), where we came close to Japan’s clearest water at caldera Lake Mashu (摩周湖) and the fantastic onsen and fly fishing hot spot of Lake Akan (阿寒湖).  While the lavender fields of Furano (富良野) and Biei (美瑛) had yet reached the peak bloom moment, the ultra fertile soil below the Tokachi Volcanic Group (十勝火山群) treated us with some of the best bread, corn, potatoes, asparagus, melons and milk that we ever had in our lives.  Despite far away from Tokyo and Osaka, the architectural magic of Tadao Ando (安藤忠雄) in Hokkaido satisfied our thirst of contemporary design and aesthetics.  Back in Obihiro (帯広), Otaru (小樽) and Sapporo (札幌), historic traces of early pioneers and contemporary dessert shops and local eateries brought us back to delightful charm of urban Japan.  What’s more?  Day after day of mouthwatering seafood, fresh produces, good coffee, and lovely patisseries reminded us how wonderful our world could be, when the water is clean, soil is rich, forests are healthy and people are friendly.  Thank you Hokkaido.  You have truly touched our hearts.

maps 2Located north of Honshu Island, Hokkaido is the second largest island in Japan.

maps 1Flying in from Tokyo Haneda, our Hokkaido journey began from Memanbetsu (女満別空港) near the Shiretoko Peninsula.  After more than 1,181km of driving, we arrived at Otaru and Sapporo at the western side of the island.

DSC_4258This black hatchback hybrid Toyota Prius c (Toyota Aqua in Japan) provided us the means of transport from east to west across Hokkaido.

DSC_4490After 2 days of rain and wind, we finally had a glimpse of the active volcano of Mount Rausu (羅臼岳), the tallest peak in Shiretoko Peninsula.

DSC_5154The greatest experience we took away from Shiretoko was the close encounter with a pod of orcas in the Nemuro Strait.

DSC_5307The Mashu Lake (摩周湖) offered us a peaceful sunrise at 3:30am.

DSC_5666Under the shadow of Mount Oakan (雄阿寒岳), dozens of fly fishermen stepped into the crystal water of Lake Akan (阿寒湖) to test their luck.

DSC_5751Farms and greenhouses were washed with heavy rain as we entered into Furano (富良野).

DSC_5893Still at least half a month to go before the peak season of lavender blossom, visitors were enjoying themselves at a relatively less crowded Farm Tomita in Nakafurano.

DSC_6040Compared with rainbow flower fields, we loved the wheat fields at Biei the most.

DSC_6183Tadao Ando’s Chapel on the Water has been famous in the designer’s world since the 1980s.

DSC_6282The Hill of Buddha is the latest addition in Hokkaido by Tadao Ando.

DSC_6466At Yoichi Distillery (余市蒸溜所), whiskey has been produced since 1934.

DSC_6538Saturdays Chocolate in Sapporo is one of the many excellent local eateries and cafes that we visited in the journey.

IMG_9267Last but not least, Hokkaido offered us the best seafood and dessert that we ever had as far as we could remember.  Let’s begin to tell the story of our journey!


DRAGON BOAT WATER PARADE (龍舟遊涌), Tai O (大澳), Hong Kong

Under the scotching sun in the summer morning of Dragon Boat Festival (端午節), former villagers and outside visitors gather along the the narrow waterways and mangrove channels of Tai O to take part in the annual Dragon Boat Water Parade and Race.  The sleepy and somewhat touristy fishing village once again fills with laughter and rhythmic drum beats, reminding elder villagers how vibrant Tai O fishing village used to be decades ago.  Now a popular sporting and recreational event that held in many cities around the world, dragon boat is actually originated right here, from the fishing communities in the Pearl River Delta where Hong Kong is located.

In the old days, young men in fishing communities in the region, like Tai O, would volunteer to join the Dragon Boat Festival.  While most would enter the boat race, a small group would participate in the religious parade, in which small statues of local deities are brought out from temples and paraded around the village in decorated dragon boats.  The dragon ritual is meant to cast away evil spirits in the village with heavy drum beats, synchronized paddling, and incense smoke.  Unlike modern dragon boats made of lightweight materials such as fiberglass or carbon fiber, traditional dragon boats are constructed using teak wood.  Each 65-ft boat takes 32 paddlers, 2 drummers, 1 gong striker, and 1 steerer.   During the Dragon Boat Festival, modern dragon boat races are held in rivers, beaches and the harbour allover Hong Kong.  Yet to get a taste of century-old dragon boat tradition, there is no better place than Tai O, where old rituals are still performed every year.

DSC_3802After an hour of ferry and 40 minutes of bus, we finally arrived at Tai O where the Dragon Boat Water Parade was about to begin at 10am.  Organizers were busy putting on the last bits of decorations onto the traditional dragon boats.

DSC_3837Flanked both sides by old stilt houses, the main waterways of Tai O provide the best setting for the dragon boat parade.

DSC_3865Decorated deity boat was always led by a long traditional dragon boat.

DSC_3872The Tai Chung Bridge opened up only in the Dragon Boat Festival for the passing deity boats.

DSC_3892The busy Tai Chung Bridge often serves as the visual focus of the entire fishing village of Tai O.

DSC_3987Despite the annual parade, fishermen were still selling fresh seafood right by the waterfront.

DSC_4030Statues of deity from three different temples were brought out for the parade.

DSC_4055Behind the designated dragon boat, the colourful deity boat was led around the waterway network.

DSC_4065Many paddlers of the traditional dragon boats came from the older generation of the local Tai O villagers.

DSC_4112The river mouth served as the main venue for dragon boat races.

DSC_4124Larger fishing boats served as the base of different racing teams.

DSC_4134It was fun to watch the dragon boat race from the spectator jetty at the waterfront.

DSC_4159All paddlers gave their best effort during the dragon boat race.

DSC_4176One of the most important aspect of dragon boat paddling is the quality of their synchronized movements.

DSC_4186The exciting shouts of loyal supporters offers outside visitors a glimpse of the community spirit of Tai O.

DSC_4207At the end, an award ceremony was held at the spectator area.

DSC_4250While the dragon boat race captivated the hearts of spectators at the river mouth, the deity boats and traditional dragon boats continued to parade around Tai O’s waterways.

DSC_4221At around noontime, the dragon boat parade was coming to an end.

DSC_4225Wooden dragon boats were once again put into storage along the waterways.

DSC_4212Until next year’s Dragon Boat Festival, visitors coming to Tai O can visit the small community museum to learn more about the traditions of dragon boat.


TAI TAM COUNTRY PARK (大潭郊野公園), Hong Kong

Occupying about one fifth of area of Hong Kong Island, Tai Tam Country Park is one of the more accessible hiking destinations in the city.  The park is famous for its four reservoirs.  Built in 1888, 1904, 1907 and 1917 respectively, the Tai Tam Upper Reservoir (大潭上水塘), Tai Tam Byewash Reservoir (大潭副水塘), Tai Tam Intermediate Reservoir (大潭中水塘) and Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir (大潭篤水塘) served as the major water sources for Hong Kong Island in the early 20th century.  These reservoirs are surrounded by a series of green hills, including Mount Parker (柏架山), Mount Butler (畢拿山), Violet Hill (紫羅蘭山), and Jardine’s Lookout (渣甸山).  A series of hiking trails wind through the hills and pass by the reservoirs, making the country park a popular hiking destination in Hong Kong.

DSC_8917One of the trailheads begins at Mount Parker Road, at a densely populated area of Quarry Bay and just a stone throw away from Taikoo Place, a busy business district in East Hong Kong Island.

DSC_8922 The country park provides a decent view for the adjacent residential developments.  Built in 1989, the five 34-level towers of Mount Parker Lodge (康景花園) present some of the most typical private residential developments for the city’s middle class.

DSC_8924Looking over to Taikoo Place, the 69-storey One Island East Tower rises above the densed residential neighbourhood of Quarry Bay.

DSC_8931.JPGOpposite to Quarry Bay and Taikoo Place, the second highest peak of Hong Kong Island, Mount Parker, is marked by the observatory station.

DSC_8934To the south we were treated with the scenery of Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir and Tai Tam Bay.

DSC_8936As we reached the lookout of Mount Butler, we were treated with the view of Quarry Bay, Taikoo Place and the distant Kai Tak runway and East Kowloon.

DSC_8941A series of four water bodies make up the group of Tai Tam Reservoirs.

DSC_8943Looking west we could see the silhouette of Wanchai and Central in the haze.

DSC_8957Completed in late 1980s, the 18-tower Hong Kong Parkview (陽明山莊) is a luxurious residential and service apartment complex right by the country park.

DSC_8958We walked from the lookout of Mount Butler down to Wong Nai Chung Gap.

DSC_8959Soon we came to a lookout over Tai Tam Reservoir.

DSC_8964Looking northwest through Wong Nai Chung Gap (黃泥涌峽), the valley in the middle of Hong Kong Island, we could see the International Commerce Centre (ICC) and East Tsim Sha Tsui across Victoria Harbour.

DSC_7192Constructed between 1883 to 1888, the Reservoir Dam and Valve House of Tai Tam Upper Reservoir (大潭上水塘) were among the first phase of reservoir construction in Tai Tam.

DSC_7169The original dam was 30.5m high and 122m long, connected to a network that brought water through tunnels and aqueducts all the way to Central.

DSC_8974On our way down to Wong Nai Chung Gap (黃泥涌峽), we passed by a former granite quarry.

DSC_8970The old quarry is now occupied by the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Depot where the police deals with explosives.

DSC_8985Hong Kong Parkview (陽明山莊) is famous of its surrounding scenic views, and also its occasional break-ins.

DSC_8992We exited the country park near Wong Nai Chung Gap.  So we came to the historic Wong Nai Chung Reservoir (黃泥涌水塘).  Built in 1889 as Hong Kong’s third reservoir, Wong Nai Chung Reservoir has been used as a boat park for 30 years from 1986 to 2017.

DSC_8997Wong Nai Chung Reservoir is one of the six pre-war reservoir groups in the city.


DAY 8 (3/5): CHAND BAORI, Abhaneri, Rajasthan, India, 2018.12.01

In 2012, Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight Trilogy had come to closure with The Dark Knight Rises.  In this final chapter of the trilogy, there was a remarkable scene where Christian Bale (Batman) escaped from a terrifying underground prison.  That underground prison was actually shot in Rajasthan, at Chand Baori of Abhaneri.  Consisted of 3500 steps over 13 stories, and with a depth of about 30m, Chand Baori is one of the biggest stepped wells in India.  The oldest parts of Chand Baori date back to the 8th century.  For centuries, the well served as a community water cistern outside of the monsoon months.

We have long been fascinated by the beautiful stepped wells of India.  Visiting Chand Baori of Abhaneri was one of the first attractions we selected for our travel itinerary.  Despite visitors can no longer walk down the well, seeing the well from the top edge is still more than worthwhile to appreciate its ancient engineering marvel and sheer beauty of the stair arrangement.

01We arrived at Chand Baori before 1pm.

02It wasn’t the best time of the day to appreciate the shadow of the stairs.

03But the sheer grandeur of the stepped well was really overwhelming.

04One side of the well is occupied by a temple and resting spaces for the royal family.

05The intricate carvings of jharokhas (windows), balconies and rooms reveal the significance of Chand Baori in the medieval time.

06Like many attractions in India, pigeons are inevitable at Chand Baori.

07Details of the architecture.

08Dressed in blue, the staff of Chand Baori stood out from the earthy background.

09Full view of Chand Baori.

10Full view of Chand Baori.

13Full view of Chand Baori.

11The scale of Chand Baori is truly amazing.

12The 3500 steps of the stepped well constitute a surreal picture as if an etched painting by Maurits Escher.

14Similar to Bhangarh, Chand Baori was popular with local school groups as well.

15Without protective railings, the stepped well can be dangerous when the place becomes too crowded.

16The staff in blue really stood out at the stepped well.

18The entire stepped well was like an open air museum.

19There was a small Hindu shrine at the exit of the stepped well.

20Panorama of Chand Baori.


DAY 4 (1/5): RESERVOIR OF THE GOLDEN CITY, Gadsisar Lake, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan, India, 2018.11.27

Our second day in Jaisalmer began with flagging down a tuk tuk in front of First Gate Home Fusion Hotel to Gadsisar Sagar or Gadsisar Lake, an artificial lake that supplied water to Jaisalmer for centuries.  Just like many places in the desert state of Rajasthan, maintaining water supply has been an essential aspect for the city’s survival.  The peaceful artificial lake was constructed at around 1400 by the Maharaja of Jaisalmer Maharwal Gadsi Singh.  As the years progressed, the lake had also become a place of pilgrimage, and venue for religious festivals and leisure boating.  Temples and shrines mushroomed around the lake, and so as religious statues and the beautiful Tilon Ki Pol (Gate of Tilon) for ceremonial purposes.  Today the lake has become a popular destination for anyone who wants to get away from the noisy streets inside the city walls of Jaisalmer.  In winter, visitors may find themselves with surprise sighting of migratory birds (along with the lake’s more permanent residents: pigeons, dogs, and the large catfish).

IMG_9569A passageway connects Gadsisar Sagar with the main road.  We arrived early in the morning when souvenir stall owners were busy setting up their stalls along the passageway.

IMG_9562Built by Tilon, a famous courtesan, the grand gate Tilon-Ki-Pol is the main gate of Gadsisar Sagar.  The maharaja refused Tilon’s proposal of the construction, but Tilon built the gate while the maharaja was away.  She put a Krishna temple atop the gate so that the maharaja could not tear it down.

IMG_9551_01The sky was a little grey despite it was out of the monsoon season.  We were delighted with the overcast weather as there was hardly any shading trees along the waterfront.

DSC_1095A group of locals were taking professional photos by the waterfront.

IMG_9565Boating is possible at Gadsisar Sagar.  During our visit, we saw one boat occupied by a group of local visitors in the lake.

IMG_9580The chattris (and their reflections) by the shore provided a photogenic setting to the lake.

DSC_1131We decided to walk along the shore for a bit.

DSC_1137We assed by some ghats and decks in front of temples.

DSC_1147No matter how far we went, the chattris near the entrance were often the focal point.

IMG_9598The scenery was peaceful and poetic if we could ignore the trash along the bank.

DSC_1150Apart from pigeons, we also saw a few other kinds of birds at the waterfront.

DSC_1164Just like anywhere else, the dominant type of birds that can live along with humans is always the pigeons.

DSC_1176As time went by, more visitors arrived at the Tilon-Ki-Pol, but hardly any would venture far beyond the entrance area.

DSC_1203Dogs are not uncommon in India, and some of them tend to follow people for a bit.

DSC_1214There are a number of Hindu temples along the shore.  They are frequented by local pilgrims.

DSC_1215Where there is Hindu temples there would be “holy men” around.

DSC_1224Upon leaving Gadsisar Sagar and Tilon-Ki-Pol, a street musician caught our attention.  He asked us our name and used one of our names in his singing performance.