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Posts tagged “Shek Tong Tsui

THE EXTINGUISHED RED LIGHTS OF SHEK TONG TSUI (石塘咀), Hong Kong

In late 2021, the box office success of biography movie Anita in Hong Kong has triggered the city’s renewal interest on the pop songs and films of Anita Mui (梅艷芳), the late local pop icon from 1980’s. One of her most well known films is Rouge (胭脂扣) in 1988. Adapted from a novel, Rouge is about the story of Fleur (played by Anita), the ghost of a 1930’s prostitute who wanders in the 1980’s Hong Kong searching for the ghost of her former lover, whom she has committed suicide together. Much of the movie was filmed in Shek Tong Tsui (石塘咀), the city’s most vibrant and glamorous red light and entertainment district between 1904 and 1935. Dressed in a 1930’s qipao dress, Fleur lingers on Shek Tong Tsui’s Hill Road and expresses frustration for the completely transformed urban scenery of the 80’s. She can hardly recognize anything in the tranquil residential neighbourhood with her 1930’s memories, from a period that many still consider to be the golden age of Shek Tong Tsui. It was the time when Shek Tong Tsui was home to dozens of large brothels (four-storey establishments each employing about 60 prostitutes) and hundreds of smaller ones, 40 high end restaurants and numerous hotels and theatres, employing more than one tenth of the city’s population (about 50,000 people in a population of less than half a million). It was the flourishing moment when wealthy merchants from all over East and Southeast Asia would come for entertainment. Wild tales of super-rich merchants contesting for their favorite top tier prostitute by competing in burning cash as fuel to make Chinese dessert from midnight till dawn, or of rich man tipping each staff in a large brothel with gold coins after marrying a popular prostitute, simply make the short-lived golden age of Shek Tong Tsui as legendary as one could imagine. It was the time when Shek Tong Tsui was a stage to showcase luxury and glamour.

The red light district of Shek Tong Tsui began in 1904, when the government relocated all Chinese brothels from Sheung Wan to this relatively undeveloped area, after the bubonic plague and a big fire devastated the densely populated Tai Ping Shan neighbourhood. Hong Kong’s history of prostitution can be traced back as far as 1840’s. Some accounts estimate that in 1844 about 10% of Chinese businesses in the Victoria City (Central and Sheung Wan) were brothels. A 1876 census indicated that out of 25,000 Chinese women in the city, more than 80% were prostitutes. This was largely due to the fact that most Chinese in 19th century Hong Kong were predominately male migrant workers from Imperial China, coming to earn a living or escape from political turmoil. This social structure was also reflected in the sex imbalance of the Chinese population during that time: from 75.4% male & 24.6% female in 1851, to 62.3% male & 37.7% female in 1901. As Hong Kong emerged as a prosperous trading hub in late 19th century, the city also became a hub for prostitution serving clients of all classes, from wealthy merchants in the region to hardworking laborers at the cargo piers.

200 years prior to the arrival of the British, Shek Tong Tsui was a hilly area at the west of Hong Kong Island. Due to its large deposit of granite stone, Hakka Chinese came to establish quarries, leaving behind many stone ponds or “shek tong” (石塘) after decades of extractions. Before land reclamation, there was a narrow peninsula sticking out the sea that resembled a beak or “tsui” (咀). Thus the area was named Shek Tong Tsui (石塘咀). In 1904, land reclamation of the area was just completed, leaving a large piece of new land awaiting for opportunities. The government’s answer was the new red light district. The red light district entered its golden age in 1920’s, when the prostitution industry emerged as a strong economic driving force for large restaurant complexes, entertainment establishments, hotels, public tramway, hair salons, theatres (most prostitutes were big fans of Chinese operas), and even department stores. In fact, prostitutes from high end brothels were some of the biggest followers of fashion trends (Shanghai and abroad) at that time. They represented a large group of cliente for department stores, shopping everything from imported clothing and silk stockings to jewellery and cosmetic products. Many high status prostitutes also led glamorous lives, and some even became celebrities due to media coverage. After celebrated prostitute Fa Ying Hen (花影恨) committed suicide at the age of 23, her death was widely reported on newspapers and over a thousand people attended her memorial service. Ten years after her death, a movie was made about her life and went on to become a box office hit in 1940.

The vibrant Shek Tong Tsui red light district came to an abrupt end in 1935, when prostitution was abolished by the government in line with Britain. Today, no trace of the red light district remains in the area. It only exists in historical accounts and photos, and in films like Rouge. Hill Road (山道), a major thoroughfare that bisects the former red light district (from Po Tuck Street down to the waterfront), has become a tranquil hillside street dotted with lovely cafes and eateries, revealing nothing about its ostentatious past. Snaking overhead in dramatic fashion, the Hill Road Flyover has become an icon of modern Shek Tong Tsui, connecting Hong Kong University up the hill and the tram depot down near the Harbour.

Skyline of Shek Tong Tsui from Victoria Harbour with Victoria Peak as backdrop. [2020]
The former red light district of Shek Tong Tsui had prompted Hong Kong University, which situated right over Hill Road, to consider relocating the campus. [Main building of University of Hong Kong, 1912, public domain]
After banning prostitution in 1935, the red light district of Shek Tong Tsui had a brief revival during the Japanese occupation in early 1940’s. After 1945, Shek Tong Tsui and Hill Road have gradually transformed into a peaceful residential neighbourhood below the campus of Hong Kong University. [Panorama of Hong Kong University (foreground), Shek Tong Tsui, and Victoria Harbour in 1945. Taken by A.L. Fiddament, 1945. Image courtesy of Rosemary Booker, University of Bristol Library RB-t0872 (www.hpcbristol.net), CC BY_NC_ND 4.0]
Flanked with brothels and restaurants, Hill Road suffered severe damages on 19 July 1926, when 534.1mm of rainfall, the highest record to date, poured down in one day. [Photograph in July 1926, Image courtesy of National Archives, Kew, University of Bristol Library NA16-085 (www.hpcbristol.net), CC BY_NC_ND 4.0]
Built in 1953, St. Anthony’s Church stands across the street from Hong Kong University, at the upper entrance of Hill Road where it meets Pok Fu Lam Road.  [Photo taken at Pok Fu Lam Road, 2022]
Under the Hill Road Flyover, a colourful staircase connects the mid section of Hill Road with Pok Fu Lam Road, where Hong Kong University stands. [Photo taken at Hill Road, 2022]
The columns of Hill Road Flyover have been painted over with murals a few times since its completion in 1981. The latest version was completed in 2021. [Photo taken at Hill Road, 2022]
The flyover makes a turn to align with Hill Road below as it descends downhill. [Photo taken at Hill Road, 2022]
The Hill Road area has gone through a subtle gentrification in recent years, welcoming a range of coffee shops, restaurants, pet shop, and even a film camera shop. [Photo taken at Hill Road, 2022]
Perpendicular to the middle section of Hill Road, Po Tuck Street (保德街) was pretty much the upper boundary of the former Shek Tong Tsui red light district. [Photo taken at Hill Road, 2022]
Today, Po Tuck Street is a sleepy dead-end dotted with cafes and tea shops, quite a bit of contrast from a few decades ago, when traditional rice stores dominated the small street. [Photo taken at Po Tuck Street, 2022]
Sitting in one of Po Tuck Street’s cafes would make one to lose the sense of time. [Photo taken at Po Tuck Street, 2022]
Cafes in the area serve mostly university students during weekdays. [Photo taken at Po Tuck Street, 2022]
Plantation by Teakha is a charming tea shop selling organic and upscale tea leaves from Taiwan, Japan, China and India. [Photo taken at Po Tuck Street, 2022]
Many old tenement apartments at Po Tuck Street have rented out their ground floor for lovely cafes. [Photo taken at Po Tuck Street, 2022]
Following the flyover and Hill Road downhill would lead to the public market of Shek Tong Tsui. [Photo taken at Hill Road, 2022]
Replacing a small street, old tenement apartments and a number of street eateries between Hill Road and Queen’s Road West, Shek Tong Tsui Market building opened in 1991. [Photo taken at Hill Road, 2022]
During Yu Lan Festival or “Hungry Ghost Festival”, bamboo pavilions would be set up below the flyover for religious ceremonies and Chinese opera. Seeing the festival rituals and bamboo opera stage at Hill Road was one of my childhood memories. [Photo taken at Hill Road, 2022]
The Hill Road Flyover bends downhill towards Queen’s Road West. [Photo taken at Hill Road, 2022]
The winding Hill Road Flyover has become an icon of Shek Tong Tsui. [Photo taken at Hill Road, 2022]
After reaching downhill, the flyover bends out towards the waterfront. [Photo taken at Hill Road, 2022]
The intersection of Hill Road and Queen’s Road West was once the heart of the former red light district, where the largest brothels and restaurant complexes stood in 1930’s. [Photo taken at intersection of Queen’s Road West and Hill Road, 2020]
The Hill Road Flyover extends over Des Voeux Road West towards the waterfront. [Photo taken at intersection of Des Voeux Road West and Hill Road, 2022]
After reaching Connaught Road West, Hill Road Flyover bends over Whitty Street Tram Depot at the waterfront near the former Instagram Pier. [Photo taken at Connaught Road West, 2021]
The Whitty Street Tram Depot (屈地街電車廠) is the main depot where trams are made and maintained. [Photo taken at Fung Mat Road, 2021]
Began operations since 1904, Hong Kong tramway is one of the world’s oldest tram system still in operation today. [Photo taken at Connaught Road West, 2021]
Taking the tram is one of the best ways to tour along the north coast of Hong Kong Island. [Photo taken at Fung Mat Road, 2021]
Some of the older models have been converted into party trams for rent. [Photo taken at Fung Mat Road, 2021]

INSTAGRAM PIER, A Short-lived Paradise in Shek Tong Tsui (石塘咀), Hong Kong

On 28th February, 2021, joggers, dog walkers, photographers, and fishing enthusiasts in Shek Tong Tsui were shocked to see their beloved Western District Public Cargo Working Area (西區公眾貨物裝卸區) had been closed off to the public. Several times voted as one of the most favourite public spaces in the city, the government freight pier was more commonly known as the Instagram Pier, thanks to its high popularity on the social media throughout the past decade. Extended westwards into the Victoria Harbour, the pier was famous for its unrivaled sunset views, along with its rustic cranes and construction materials for selfie backdrops, and handsome reflections of sunset skies in water puddles after rain, an effect that prompted netizens to name the pier “Mirror of the Sky” (天空之鏡). The magnificent open space has become an Internet sensation since 2010, but not until 2015, when the MTR extended to Sai Wan (西環), that a much larger influx of outsiders and oversea visitors, especially the younger generation, had arrived at the pier to chill out under the western sun.

For the local community, the pier had served as their collective backyard since the 1990’s. They would hang out at the loading and unloading area, to jog, fish and walk the dog. It was the sense of freedom and spatial openness (a rarity in Downtown Hong Kong) that made the pier such a unique public space for the community. In November 2014, the Marine Department put up warning notices at the pier to dissuade the public from entering the pier. The notices had make little impact on altering the common perception that the pier was a leisure space available for all. Since then, the authorities had made a few proposal to erect railings and partially converted the pier into a “proper” park. The government’s intent had met with fierce objections from the community. While the government’s main aim was to reduce liability (if any accident happen) and establish a higher degree of control, what the community and visitors truly appreciate about the pier was the vast open space and unobstructed views, the freedom to use the space in any way one could think of, and the lack of unwanted street furniture, eyesore decorations, and flimsy exercise equipment that might not last for a few months.

Between 2010 and 2021, the Instagram Pier has left its unique mark in the story of Shek Tong Tsui. Not only was it the most visited attraction in the neighborhood, it was also the perfect spot in town where one could idly spend an afternoon to simply do nothing without interference from another human being (not even a park caretaker). It was also one of the most interesting spots in Hong Kong for people watching: strangers mingling with strangers, couple taking wedding shots, students sitting in a circle having their first sip of beer, girls learning skateboard with her boyfriend, man practicing guitar by the sea, unleashed dogs chasing one another, photo enthusiasts lying on the floor just to make the perfect shot of reflection out of a water puddle, women in fancy dresses climbing up and down the shipping pallets, scaffolding bamboo and construction materials to make all sorts of weird posts for selfies… Of course, such freedom would lead to issues with safety, hygiene and garbage to deal with. For the authorities, a public space should be finished with pavers, bounded with handrails and walls, equipped with park benches and flower beds, and spaces clearly defined for specific functions. For many, on the other hand, the Instagram Pier had represented almost the opposite: a stress-free and causal open space with little regulations and no specific facilities, just good views and emptiness. Recently, the pier has another layer of political consideration: a possible springboard for exploring the next potential land reclamation, connecting the west of Hong Kong Island to the distant Lantau Island via bridges and artificial islands. Even if the land reclamation doesn’t go ahead and the pier gets renovated and reopened as a public promenade in the future, we can pretty much assume that the space would be properly paved and fully equipped with railings. The floor would be flattened, leaving little chances for water puddles. For photography enthusiasts, the “Mirror of the Sky” at Sai Wan has officially become a story of the past.

The waterfront of Shek Tong Tsui has long been used for cargo docks and rice warehouses since the early 20th century. [Photograph by Mitchell Eleanor, around 1912-17. Image courtesy of E.G. France, University of Bristol Library Mi01-002 (www.hpcbristol.net), CC BY_NC_ND 4.0]
At the Instagram Pier, loads of building materials such as concrete blocks and scaffolding bamboo are often piled up by the side, waiting for transport to their next destination. [2020]
The enormous pile of bamboo was one of the favorite backdrop for people to take selfies. [2020]
Since MTR extended to Sai Wan, more outside visitors had arrived at the pier during weekends and after work. [2020]
The pier was frequented by runners and joggers. [2020]
At the pier, every visitor could easier find a spot to do his or her own thing. In many cases, the pier might be a much more desirable location than one’s tiny flat for certainly activities, such as playing music for a girlfriend. [2020]
A ladder was a handy tool to take portraits with the sea backdrop. [2020]
Sunset on a fine day would draw the crowds to the pier after work. [2020]
To the southwest, the buildings of Kennedy Town and Mount Davis were bathed in the golden sunlight. [2020]
Across Victoria Harbour, Stonecutters Bridge (昂船洲大橋) and the container port at Kwai Chung and Tsing Yi form a distinct scenery from the northwestern waterfront of Hong Kong Island. [2020]
The sunset over distant Lantau Island west of the pier was always the biggest draw for the crowds. [2020]
Without balustrade or benches, watching the sunset at the Instagram Pier was a perfect thing to end the day for any couple. [2020]
Young visitors loved to take selfies at the pier and post the images onto social media, spreading the words about the Instagram Pier throughout the city. [2020]
Not everyone came to the pier for selfies, some came for a “picnic”. [2020]
The Instagram Pier was one of the best spot in town for people watching. [2020]
Each group visitor would find their own spot to chill out. [2020]
Not park benches or planters, all there was is open space for people to wander. [2020]
Or hideaway spots away from the bustling and sometimes tiring urban scenes of Hong Kong. [2020]
The combination of the peaceful harbour scenery and the rustic pallets and container boxes offer an interesting contrast. [2020]
Finding a place in Hong Kong city centre that allows one to enjoy solitude is no easy thing. The Instagram Pier was a unique exception. [2020]
Even after sunset, visitors would come to the pier to chill out after dinner. [2020]
Without any regulations of what were prohibited at the pier, visitors basically would use the space for whatever they could think of. BMX cyclists were common users of the pier. [2020]
The lamppost guards were popular for seating and selfies taking. [2020]
Skateboarding was a perfect fit for the rustic ambience of the pier. [2020]
Dog owners chatted while their dogs mingled and ran away. [2020]
Every ten metres or so there would be someone fishing. [2020]
The Instagram Pier would certain remain as a collective memory for the local community for years to come. [2020]
Probably once serving as the most causal open space in town, the Instagram Pier would live long in people’s memories. [2020]

***

While the Instagram Pier was closed down indefinitely in 2021, the adjacent Central and Western District Promenade has opened in the same year to the public. The ambience reflects quite a different story from the Instagram Pier, from rustic and cool environment preferred by the youth, to kid-friendly and orderly catered for the kids and elderly.

At the new promenade, cute figures would take the place of scaffolding bamboos and container boxes to serve as selfie backdrop. [2021]
3D painting on the floor also offers another feature for selfie takers. [2021]
From Shek Tong Tsui, the new promenade extends eastwards to Sai Ying Pun and Sheung Wan.
Probably the most interesting feature at the new promenade is the set of concrete drainage tunnel where kids can enjoy themselves by crawling in. [2021]
Fixed exercise facilities are provided at the new promenade targeted for the elderly. [2021]
Not quite spectacular as the one at the former Instagram Pier, visitors could still watch the sunset at a lookout fully protected by railing. Quite a different experience. [2021]
One thing hasn’t changed: as long there is access to the sea there will be someone fishing. [2021]
As long as there is space to roam freely, the dogs would always be happy, and so as their owners. [2021]

URBAN METAMORPHOSIS THAT WOULD NEVER LOOKED BACK, Kennedy Town (堅尼地城), Hong Kong

The first 130 or so small units of Kennedy 38, a new residential development in Kennedy Town, went on sell in November 2021 during the pandemic. Ranging from 229 to 332 sq.ft with an average price of HK$27,522 per sq.ft, 1400 interested parties registered as potential buyers, translating to about 10 bids for each available flat. A few days later, prices went up even higher for the upper floor units. A 287 sq.ft unit was selling for HK$10.24m (US$1.31m). While this may not match the most pricey developments in Hong Kong, US$1.31m for 287 sq.ft is not a friendly price tag either, especially for Kennedy Town, a neighbourhood that not long ago was still considered as Hong Kong’s de facto back-of-house. Today, things have obviously changed. Kennedy Town is now marketed as the up and coming neighbourhood on Hong Kong Island accessible by the mass transit railway (MTR), and a destination where the Harbour, Mount Davis and HKU are just minutes of walk away.

Gentrification has been happening in many parts of the city, but not that many places can match the 180 degree makeover of Kennedy Town, not only for its appearance, but also its identity. The westernmost settlement on Hong Kong Island was named after Arthur Edward Kennedy, the 7th governor of colonial Hong Kong in 1870’s who was responsible for substantial land reclamation and developments in Kennedy Town. Due to its considerable distance (3.5km, not that far in today’s standards) from Central, the city’s central business district, Kennedy Town was seen as an outpost in the early days. From late 19th century to the hundred years that followed, Kennedy Town was home to all sorts of the city’s undesirable but necessary supporting facilities: infectious disease hospital, mortuary, cemeteries, mental health hospital, poultry houses, depots for cattle, pigs and sheep, massive slaughterhouses, battery factories, waste incinerator, etc. From 1894 when the first slaughterhouse began operations, to 2007 when the demolition of Kennedy Town Abattoir and Incinerator finally took place, the impression that combines foul smell, animal whimpers, polluted air, and streets of blood and feathers on Kennedy Town have deeply imprinted in the collective psyche of many Hongkongers.


Then everything changed almost overnight on 28th of December 2014, when the MTR finally opened the Kennedy Town Station, bringing flocks of outsiders into the westernmost neighbourhood on Hong Kong Island. Then suddenly everyone realized that at only four stops west of Central, Kennedy Town is in fact a tranquil neighborhood where a less crowded waterfront and friendly old shops await for visitors to explore. Unsurprisingly, real estate developers were the first to arrive, tapping in the neighbourhood’s potentials by erecting blocks after blocks of luxury sea-facing apartments. Then came fancy restaurants, pubs, cafes, bakeries, cinema, lifestyle shops, etc. To maximize development potentials for the area, buildings in Kennedy Town associated with its dark past were all but wiped out. Shadows of the past have quietly faded away under collective oblivion. Yet if one looks careful enough, traces of the past are still visible in hidden corners and fenced off brown sites. Under the warm afternoon sun, the air is full of distant laughter from cafes, sport bars and waterfront promenade. Even a ruined slaughterhouse or a roadside tombstone of a 19th-century plague victim may not seem that spooky anymore.

The Skyline of Shek Tong Tsui (石塘咀) to the left and Kennedy Town (堅尼地城) to the right, with Kennedy Town Swimming Pool complex standing at the middle foreground. [Photo taken from the Harbour, 2020]
After series of land reclamation, the latest coastline is located at New Praya Kennedy Town. [Photo taken at New Praya Kennedy Town, 2020]
Situated at the western end of Hong Kong Island’s north shore , the Kennedy Town waterfront offers some fantastic views of the container ports at Stonecutters (昂船洲) and Tsing Yi (青衣) across Victoria Harbour. [Photo taken at New Praya Kennedy Town, 2020]
Leisure fishing is very common along the waterfront of Victoria Harbour. [Photo taken at New Praya Kennedy Town, 2022]
Southwest from the intersection of Cadogan Street and New Praya once stood the massive compound of Kennedy Town Abattoir and Incinerator. The structures were demolished in 2009. [Photo taken at New Praya Kennedy Town, 2022]
The incinerator is no longer standing behind the corrugated metal hoarding, yet a refuse and recycling station continues to occupy a part of the former incinerator’s site. Today, the mortuary at far left in the photo continues to serve the public as one of the three public mortuaries in Hong Kong. [Photo taken on a slope over Victoria Road, 2022]
The imposing chimneys of the incinerator and adjacent abattoir compound were once the most prominent features in the skyline of Kennedy Town. [Photo courtesy: Wiki Commons by ken93110, taken in 1968, (CC BY-SA 3.0)]
Hidden from Victoria Road on a slope full of wild plants and fig trees lie the ruins of a former shanty town, where tombstones of the 1894 plague victims from a largely forgotten cemetery nearby were taken as construction materials (stairs or wall cladding) decades ago. [Photo taken near intersection of Victoria Road and Sai Ning Street, 2022]
Caption from University of Bristol – Historical Photographs of China reference number: Bk09-03. “Photograph taken from the recreation ground of Hong Kong University of the western entrance to Victoria Harbour. In the foreground is Kennedy Town (堅尼地城). The large buildings in the far centre are the infectious diseases hospital. On the left is an abattoir, and sheep, pig and cattle depots. Towards the right, between Forbes Street and Victoria Road, are rope and glass factories.” [Photograph by Denis H. Hazell. Image courtesy of ‘Picturesque Hong Kong’ (Ye Olde Printerie Ltd., Hong Kong), c.1925., University of Bristol Library (www.hpcbristol.net)]
The original infectious diseases hospital was long gone. Only a memorial arch from the former building survives to the present. [Photo taken at intersection of Victoria Road and Sai Ning Street, 2020]
200m inwards from the waterfront, the impressive stone wall trees on a century-old retaining wall is perhaps one of the most iconic attractions in Kennedy Town. The tree wall is briefly featured in David Attenborough’s The Green Planet. [Photo taken at Forbes Street, 2022]
Above the stone wall trees stand the remnants of the old slaughterhouse and pig/sheep depots. An account from 1922 suggested that there were 292,184 pigs and 30,732 sheep at the depot, at a time when the human population in Hong Kong was around 725,000. [Photo taken at Forbes Street, 2022]
The intersection of Rockhill Street and Smithfield Road was once occupied by a large cattle depot. An old account mentions that there were 46,347 heads of cattle (87% of the city’s cattle population) at the facility in 1922. Today, the site is home to the multi storey municipal block, housing a public library and a wide range of sporting facilities. [Photo taken at intersection of Rockhill Street and Smithfield Road, 2022]
While all abattoirs have been moved out of Kennedy Town, legacies from the former slaughterhouses remain in the neighbourhood, such as the odd opening hours (03:00 – 16:00) of Sun Hing (新興食家), who used to serve the slaughterhouse workers in the wee hours. [Photo taken in Sun Hing Restaurant at Smithfield Road, 2020]
The 59-year old Tung Fat Building (同發大樓) has been refurbished in recent years from a rundown apartment into an upscale loft apartment. Designed by Australian architect Kerry Phelan Design Office, the project is a rarity in Hong Kong since most landlords would prefer to knock down the old building and erect a new residential skyscraper in order to maximize the financial reward. [Photo taken at New Praya Kennedy Town, 2022]
A 1,300 sq.ft unit at Tung Fat Building (同發大樓) was asking for HK$88k (approx. US$11,300) per month for rent. [Photo taken at New Praya Kennedy Town, 2022]
Just down the street from the stone wall trees, fancy restaurants and pubs have found their feet across the street from Sai Wan Estate, a public housing complex that has been around since 1958. [Photo taken at intersection of Davis and Forbes Street, 2022]
Of course, retail spaces with sea views are perfect for restaurants, cafes, and bars. [Photo taken at New Praya Kennedy Town, 2022]
Many restaurants make use of their waterfront location to create a marine ambience. [Photo taken at New Praya Kennedy Town, 2020]
With an influx of expats entering the neighbourhood, Australian craft beer Little Creatures has joined the F&B scene of Kennedy Town in 2015. Everything was on the up side until the pandemic hit, forcing the beer hall to close its doors in 2020 after 4.5 years of operations. [Photo taken at Little Creatures, New Praya Kennedy Town, 2020]
Golden Scene, a local film distributor is brave enough to open their first ever neighbourhood cinema in Kennedy Town in February 2021 during the pandemic. [Photo taken intersection of Catchick Street and North Street, 2021]
Fully opened in 2017, the fluid form of the second generation of Kennedy Town Swimming Pool signifies a new era for the neighbourhood. [Photo taken at Shing Sai Road, 2022]
Apartments in Kennedy Town seem to be getting taller and taller in the past decade. [Photo taken in Belcher Bay Harbourfront at Shing Sai Road, 2022]
Opened in 2020, the Belcher Bay Harbourfront has immediately become a popular spot for the community. [Photo taken in Belcher Bay Harbourfront at Shing Sai Road, 2022]
The Belcher Bay Harbourfront offers great views of the sea, and decent outdoor spaces for a wide range of leisure activities. [Photo taken in Belcher Bay Harbourfront at Shing Sai Road, 2022]
It is so chill to skateboard right next to the Harbour. [Photo taken in Belcher Bay Harbourfront at Shing Sai Road, 2022]