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Posts tagged “Qalaat Samaan

CHURCH OF SAINT SIMEON STYLITES, Aleppo, Syria

2006.05.11.

Simeon Stylites, a famous ascetic saint seeking for a spiritual life of extreme austerity, spent 37 years living on a small platform atop a pillar.  Probably born in 390 AD, Simeon was devoted to Christianity since about 13 years old.  His practice of extreme austerity led him to a pursuit of an ascetic life in seclusion.  In order to avoid the crowd of pilgrims seeking for his prayers, Simeon found a pillar from an ancient ruins and built a platform of about one square metre on top and started his 37 year living on a pillar.  He moved to different columns throughout his life.  The last was recorded to be more than 15m from ground.  Instead of isolated from the society, his fame grew even greater after living on a pillar.  He would talk to visitors from a ladder, wrote letters, instructed disciplines, hosted lectures for an assembly down below.  Even the Roman emperors greatly respected Simeon and his counsels.  He died in 459 AD after 37 years spent on a pillar.  After his death, stylites or pillar dwellers had become a kind of popular Christian ascetics in early Byzantine era.  Qalaat Samaan, or the Church of Saint Simeon Stylites, is a 5th century church built on the site of Simeon’s pillar.  Before the construction of Hagia Sophia, the Church of Saint Simeon had the most famous dome in the world of Christendom. Over the last 1600 years, the basilica survived earthquakes and wars, but had met its fate of destruction being at the wrong place at the wrong time: at the crossroad among forces of the Syrian, ISIS, Kurdish, Turkish, Russians and other rebels.  Since taken by the ISIS in 2013, the complex had gone through several years of absolute chaos and madness, missile bombing and stone removal, all causing significant damages to the world heritage complex.  What believed to be the remains of Simeon’s pillar was damaged by Russian air strikes in support of Assad’s regime.  Along with the destruction of old Aleppo, Qalaat Samaan’s ill fate is another great loss to human civilization that no reconstruction work can ever restore.

Saint_Simeon_Stylites_the_Elder_(1664_icon)A 1664 depiction of Saint Simeon Stylites the Elder, Musee d’Art et d’Histoire, Geneva.

From the bus station of Aleppo we hired a car to Qalaat Samaan, the famous ruins of the four basilicas built in the 5th century dedicated to Saint Simeon Stylites.  The ruins was rather remote, at approximately 2 hour of drive north of Aleppo.  We were amazed by the grand scale of the complex, and found the ruined archways very photogenic.  We finished our visit at around 11:00 and didn’t have a clue of how to return to Aleppo, as our hired car only offered an one way trip.  No public transportation was available, and we were up on a hill far from the highway.  At the parking lot, I decided to try hitchhiking.   Since there were six of us it wasn’t easy.  I headed towards a tour bus in which the driver was reading newspaper.  I tried to communicate with him in English and luckily he understood my request.  He led me to the tour guide and the group of Spanish tourists.  They agreed to take us along all at once as they were leaving for Aleppo as well.  They were not a big group, around 15 of them, mainly in their 50s. The bus was the most luxurious tour bus we had ever seen, with large comfortable chairs and a banquette seating area at the back where we settled ourselves comfortably.  Their bus even dropped by one of the 700 sites of the Dead Cities along the way.  We were invited to go along with them.  On the bus, the Spanish group kindly offered us biscuits and snacks. The bus was so comfortable that at the end we all fell asleep.  When we woke up we had already back at the Citadel of Aleppo.  This remained as our only hitchhiking experience in the Middle East.

06ME23-19Saint Simeon was an influential figure 1500 years ago, prompting people to construct a large church complex shortly after his death at the site of his pillar.  The ruined complex is consisted of the main Church of Saint Simeon, Baptistry, and Monastery.

Qala'at Samaan 5The Church of Saint Simeon had about 5000 sq.m of floor space, almost comparable to that of the Hagia Sophia.  It was designed in a cruciform with four basilica centered at the octagonal courtyard where the remains of the pillar of Saint Simeon stood.

Qala'at Samaan 7Built in 490 AD, the church was one of the earliest churches in this part of the world.

Qala'at Samaan 6The massive archways are the most well preserved elements of the complex.

06ME24-08The fine details of the arches and column capitals are valuable artefact from the early Byzantine era.

Qala'at Samaan 8We could have spend a long time to study the fine details of the ruins.

06ME24-13Much of the walls of the four basilicas remained intact in 2006 when we visited.

Qala'at Samaan 10Along with the Ancient Villages of Northern Syria, the church was declared an UNESCO World Heritage site in 2011.  However taken by ISIS in 2013, the church had entered a few years of absolute madness and destruction.

06ME24-15Irina Bokova, the Director-General of UNESCO, strongly condemned the severe damage caused by an air-strike to the Church of Saint Simeon.

Qala'at Samaan 9The most important spot of the complex is the octagonal courtyard where the remains of Simeon’s pillar stood before the war.

06ME24-16What remained from the 15m pillar where Saint Simeon once lived atop had become less than 3m tall before the Syrian Civil War.  After the Russian air strike, the spot has become nothing but a pile of rubble.

06ME24-18There were hardly any explanations or signage at the ruins, but we were free to walk around the complex.

06ME24-21The Eastern Basilica was beautifully preserved.  It was larger than the others, and used to held all major ceremonies.

06ME24-22Since 2003, the complex had been regularly surveyed and scanned by the French.  Their 3D documentation prior to the building’s partial destruction in 2016 may prove to be crucial for its future restoration.

06ME23-35The octagonal Baptistery was a crucial part of the pilgrimage complex.

Qala'at Samaan 3The Baptistery is one of the best preserved Christian architecture in Syria.

06ME23-24Baptistry Baptistry was constructed shortly after the construction of the main church. The wooden roof, either a cone or dome, didn’t survive to this day.

Qala'at Samaan 2Since the complex was erected on the hill, there were spots where we could enjoy the surrounding scenery down below.

06ME24-14As of 2020, Idlib, the city near the Church of Saint Simeon Stylite, was the latest battle ground between the Jihadist forces, Turkish backed rebels, Russian backed Syrian government and Kurdish forces.