ultramarinus – beyond the sea

Posts tagged “plaza

URBAN OASIS, Tokyu Plaza Omotesando Harajuku (原宿), Tokyo (東京), Japan

Perched above the northeast intersection of Meiji Dori (明治道り) and Omotesando Dori (表参道), a charming little oasis is hidden atop the shopping centre Tokyu Plaza.  From street level, the gleaming mall entrance resembles a giant kaleidoscope with a myriad of mirrors wrapping a set of grand escalators and stair, like a glittering passageway heading up into the building.  Looking overhead, clusters of greenery stick out from the roof parapet, revealing the lovely rooftop terrace above the shopping levels.  What the local design firm Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP gives visitors is a pleasant surprise on the roof, a little roof garden of trees and plantings, seating and stepped platforms, overlooking the busy urban streets at the heart of Harajuku (原宿).

1The kaleidoscope-like mall entrance is a decent design to capture the attention of pedestrians.

2It’s fun to go through the kaleidoscope-like passageway.  Looking out of the entrance feels like standing inside a cave made of mirrors.

3The intersection of Meiji Dori (明治道り) and Omotesando Dori (表参道) is busy anytime throughout the day.

4After going through the shopping levels, a wooden stairway leads up to the top level of restaurants and cafe, and the lovely roof terrace.

5At the roof terrace, a hexagonal decking system provide great seating for shoppers and cafe customers.

DSC_3061After a long day of shopping and walking, many visitors choose to take a brief stop at this pleasant roof terrace at the top of Tokyu Plaza.

6

DSC_3087In the middle, a raised planter surrounded by a counter and high chairs is actually part of the skylight providing natural light for the level below.

7The decking and the roof terrace can also serve as a small performance venue.

8From the relaxing rooftop, the busy street scene below seems like a distant world.  While pedestrians rush across the streets, visitors of the roof terrace rest in harmony with a manmade nature several storeys above.

934 trees and 50+ different types of plants are planted on the terrace on what architect Hiroshi Nakamura describes as a “roof forest”.

DSC_3096At the lower levels, smaller balconies also provide spaces for relaxation with a close encounter with the zelkova trees that line the sidewalk of Omotesandō (表参道), the traditional procession route of Meiji Shrine (明治神宮).

IMG_5916From the street, the Tokyu Plaza Omotesandō look like an interesting piece of modern architecture with a light and transparent base and a solid upper part that supports the greenery at the top.

Advertisements

DAY 45 (2 OF 2) – MUSEUMS AND PLAZA, SALTA, ARGENTINA

Leaving Tilcara and the Quebrada de Humahuaca behind, we headed south to Salta, one of the most visited cities in Northern Argentina.  Renowned for its beautiful plaza and churches, Salta has in fact quite a small town feeling.  After a quick lunch, we made our way to the main plaza to visit the Museo de Arqueología de Alta Montaña (MAAM).  Small in scale, the MAAM is dedicated entirely to the three child mummies (aged from 6 to 15) found on the summit of Volcán Llullaillaco in 1999.  At over 6,700m, the burial site of the mummies is considered to be one of the highest archaeological sites in the world.  Although small, the collection, which includes the treasure trove of each mummy and the three mummies themselves, was quite impressive.  Due to conservation, only one of the three mummies would be on display at a time.  During our visit, we saw the “Lightening Girl”.  Aged about 6 years old when buried, the “Lightening Girl” was stuck by lightening sometime in the past centuries, leaving a burnt mark on her face and clothing.  From the English descriptions, we were able to obtain a brief understanding of the traditions of human sacrifices during the Inca period at about 500 years ago.
After MAAM, we decided to visit Pajcha Museo de Arte Etnico Americano, a small museum described by the Lonely Planet as “an eye-opening private museum” and “a must-see if you’re interested in indigenous art and culture”.   The small collection of masks, textiles, artifacts, and garments from a number of Latin American countries was interesting, especially the way how artifacts were being displayed along with contemporary art and crafts to provide a sense of cultural continuity, but the mandatory guide tour was a little pushy at times.  In the evening, we headed back to the plaza and ended up having fast food for dinner.
ImageImageImageImage

* * *

Read other posts on Northwest Argentina in 2013 South America:

Day 43.1 – Garganta del Diablo, Tilcara
Day 43.2 – Pucara, Tilcara
Day 44.1 – Hills of Seven Colours, Purmamarca
Day 44.2 – Cemetery, Purmamarca
Day 45.1 – Antigua Gusthouse, Tilcara
Day 45.2 – Museums and Plaza, Salta
Day 46.1 – Carpe Diem, Salta
Day 46.2 – Helados Miranda, Cafayate
Day 46.3 – Bodega el Porvenir, Cafayate
Day 47.1 – Bodega Domingo Molina, Cafayate
Day 47.2 – Quebrada Las Conchas, Cafayate
Day 48.1 – Museo de Vino, Cafayate
Day 48.2 – El Hornito, Cafayate
Day 48.3 – Goodbye Northern Argentina, Salta

* * *

South America 2013 – Our Destinations
Buenos Aires (Argentina), Iguazu Falls (Argentina/Brazil), Pantanal (Brazil), Brasilia (Brazil), Belo Horizonte & Inhotim (Brazil), Ouro Preto (Brazil), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), Paraty (Brazil), Sao Paulo (Brazil), Samaipata & Santa Cruz (Bolivia), Sucre (Bolivia), Potosi (Bolivia), Southwest Circuit (Bolivia), Tilcara, Purmamarca, Salta (Argentina), Cafayate (Argentina), San Pedro de Atacama (Chile), Antofagasta & Paranal Observatory (Chile), Chiloe (Chile), Puerto Varas (Chile), Torres del Paine (Chile), Ushuaia (Argentina), El Chalten (Argentina), El Calafate (Argentina), Isla Magdalena (Argentina), Santiago (Chile), Valparaiso (Chile), Afterthought