ultramarinus – beyond the sea

Posts tagged “forest

TAKINO’O PATH & SACRED BRIDGE, Nikko (日光), Japan

Every visitor who comes to Nikko would be impressed by the century-old cedar forests surrounding the shrines and temples.  What looks like a natural forest is in fact partially orchestrated by people 400 years ago, creating what we now called the Cedar Avenue of Nikko (日光杉並木), a 35.41km tree-lined path with 13,000 Japanese Red Cedar. The Cryptomeria tree (Sugi), also known as Japanese Red Cedar, is the national tree of Japan.  We didn’t walk the Cedar Avenue of Nikko, the world’s longest tree lined avenue in Nikko, but instead, had our own close encounter with the magnificent cedar trees in a along the Takino’o Path.  We came across the Takino’o Path from online research.  For about an hour, the trail led us through its tranquil cedar forest and peaceful Shinto shrines.   We began our journey from the Futarasan Shrine, passed by the Takino Shrine (瀧尾神社) and ended at the Sacred Bridge of Nikko, the Shinkyo (神橋).

01The trail head of Takino Path was right beside the forecourt of Futarasan Shrine.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe trail passed by the the Taiyuin and Futarasan Shrine.

03A few minutes later, we arrived at a small shrine by the path.  It reminded us of Kumano Kodo, where we enjoyed a few days of hiking on the Kii Mountains of Kansai.

04For a very long day hike, some visitors would climb the Mount Nyoho (女峰山, 2,465m).

05The cedar forest soon got denser.

06Along the trail, we could closely the centuries old Japanese Cedar.

12Along the way, many old cedar trees were very photogenic.

07After the crowded and relatively noisy experience at the Toshogu Shrine, only five minutes into the trail brought us to a completely opposite world of tranquility and lush green.

08After about half an hour of leisure walking, we were soon approaching the Takino’o Shrine (瀧尾神社) in the forest.

09After walking up the hill of Takino’o Shrine (瀧尾神社), we passed by a number of atmospheric small shrines.

DSC_7881Kaji Sadayoshi, a supporter of Tokugawa Iemitsu, built the Undameshi No Tori (運試しの鳥居).  Like many visitors, we tested our luck by throwing a pebble through the hole between the two horizontal members of the tori gate.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACertain parts of the trail were covered with historical paving stones.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Kodane Stone (子種石) behind an old tori gate near the Takino’o Shrine is believed to have the power of child birth.

13On our way back out of the forest towards Shinkyo (神橋), we passed by Kannon Do Shrine, the Shrine of Safe and Easy Delivery of Child or Kyosha-do (香車堂).

14After a little over half an hour, we returned to the main entrance of the World Heritage Shrine and Temple Park.

15Across the street from the UNESCO World Heritage plaque, we finally reached the Shinkyo (神橋), the Sacred Bridge of Nikko.

16We didn’t pay the admission fee to walk onto the Shinkyo (神橋).  We walked over to the nearby bus stop for a ride to Lake Chuzenji (中禅寺湖).  Beside the bus stop there was an interesting telephone booth made of a recycled gondola.

 

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ART, ARCHITECTURE + NATURE, Hiroshi Senju Museum (千住博美術館), Karuizawa (軽井沢) , Japan

In a November evening in 2012, we attended an architectural lecture at University of Toronto by Ryue Nishizawa (西沢立衛), one of the two principals of the world acclaimed architectural firm SANAA.  In that lecture, he talked about several of his projects, including his recent projects (back then), the minimal Louvre Gallery in Lens of France and the sculptural teardrop of Teshima Art Museum (豊島美術館).  At about the same time, he also finished an art gallery in Karuizawa, famous for the undulating gallery floor that resembles the natural terrain and the curvilinear glass enclosure of landscaped lightwells.  Hiroshi Senju Museum of Karuizawa (軽井沢千住博美術館) was the main reason for our Karuizawa day trip out of Tokyo.  Hiroshi Senju (千住博) is a Japanese painting known for his large scale waterfall paintings.  He was the first Asian artist to receive a Honorable Mention at the Venice Biennale in 1995.  Admiring Hiroshi Senju’s landscape paintings in Ryue Nishizawa’s landscape inspired architecture is like seeing art in a minimalist manmade forest in Karuizawa.

1The museum is located out of the tourist area of Karuizawa.  After getting off at the nearest bus stop, we walked a bit along a country road to reach the museum.  A unique white sign greeted us at the museum forecourt.

2Before seeing the white and minimalist main museum building, we passe by another interesting piece of architecture, the panel cladded visitor centre.

3From the parking lot, a winding pathway led us to the entrance of the main museum building.

6We entered the main exhibition space through the transparent entrance vestibule.  From outside, it was impossible to imagine what surprises lie ahead in front of us.

7Once inside, we were immediately captivated by the harmonious relationship between art, architecture and nature.

8Walking on the gently sloping floor of the museum as if strolling on the pre-existing natural terrain of the site.  Even the seating matches the curvilinear forested lightwells inside the exhibition space.

10 Curvilinear glass enclosure of various sizes create a number of naturalistic lightwells or miniature forests.

11Walking between two lightwells felt like wandering through two art installations in a forest.

12Other than the paintings by Hiroshi Senju, the lightwells of the building were definitely unique art pieces for me.

13Back at the main parking lot, the sleek and dark visitor centre expresses a totally different tone.

14While the main museum is all about its nature-inspired interior, the visitor centre contrastingly tells a form-driven design story.

 

 


A TALE OF ROCKS AND MAPLES, Algonquin, Ontario, Canada (2/3)

Two billions years has passed since volcanic lava hardened into rock formations that stretched as far as the horizon, covering over half the size of what we now know as Canada.  Millions of years of rain and snow gradually sculpted off the high peaks and odd spires, leaving behind a low relief of undulating rocky terrain mainly made of volcanic igneous rocks.  Being as some of the oldest rock formations on this planet, the Canadian Shield or the Laurentian Plateau is far older than any myths or tales being told in North America.  10,000 years ago, the last Ice Age came to an end, and the retreating glaciers carved out valleys, scraped away sediment and soil, and left behind thousands of lakes and rivers and bogs that make up the majority of Canadian landscape.  Part of the southern tip of the Canadian Shield is exposed with visible ridges and low plateaus.  Along with the myriad of lakes and rivers and bogs spreading over this tip of the rocky shield, and the relatively young forests of spruces, birch and maple, people found a charming beauty from this piece of ancient land.  Native people once resided here a few thousands years ago, then came the Europeans, then came loggers and the railway, tourists and the highway.  This is how the tale of Algonquin Park unfolds.

The Acer saccharum or Sugar Maple, from maple syrup to autumn foliage, is a major contributor that shapes the identity of Ontario, Quebec and Northern US.  Despite its vast distribution across much of the Northern Hemisphere, the maple and its leaves are commonly associated with Canada and the Canadian flag.  First being adopted as an emblem by a group of French Canadians in the 18th century, the maple leaf was then included in the coat of arms of Ontario and Quebec and later of the entire nation.  As a symbol of strength and endurance, the maple leaf was finally chosen and became the Canadian national flag in 1965.  Appearing on a number of Tom Thomson’s paintings, the sugar maples in the Algonquin emerged as the visual focus in this Canadian landscape every autumn.  Seeing the fire crimson maple crowns stand out against a backdrop of dark evergreen and golden birch trees reflected in the serene lake water has become an annual ritual for many, attracting uncounted numbers of tourists every October entering the gate of Algonquin and hiking one of the interpretative trails along the Highway 60 Corridor.  This is the moment when the unforgiving nature appears to be the tamest and easiest for human appreciation.  This is how the maple story intertwines with the tale of the mighty ancient rocks of Algonquin.

1Autumn foliage of sugar maple tree.

2Other than crimson maples, the golden birch trees and evergreen complete the colour palette of Algonquin autumn.

3We may not be lucky enough to have caught the peak of fall colour every year but we still enjoy every moments in Algonquin Park when the fallen leaves with various tones of red and orange pave the trail.

4We enjoy hiking in the fall without the hassles from mosquitoes or black flies; so we can focus on the natural beauty around us.

5Moss and roots and fallen leaves.

6At the lookout of Booth’s Rock trail, distant maple hills and the peaceful Rock Lake make up the stunning scenery of Algonquin. It was the most rewarding moment to reach the lookout overlooking the river from a high point.

7Rock Lake and the maple hills.

8Standing on the rock ridge overlooking the forests and lakes of Algonquin, observing the cloud shadow sweeping across the landscape, is remarkable.

9Stone cairns by the shore of Rock Lake.

10Fire red maples in contrast with the evergreen at the background.

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Read other posts on Parks of Southern Ontario
1.1 Land of Water and Forest, Algonquin Park, Ontario ( 1 of 3)
1.2 A Tale of Rocks and Maples, Algonquin, Ontario ( 2 of 3)
1.3 When Moose Meets Beaver, Algonquin, Ontario, (3/3)
2. Ancient Reef and Escarpment, Bruce Peninsula, Ontario
3. Algonquin Legend and Mazinaw Pictographs, Bon Echo Provincial Park, Ontario


LAND OF WATER AND FOREST, Algonquin Park, Ontario, Canada (1/3)

From now on, not only will we continue to write about our current travel experiences, we are also going to revisit some of our past adventures and share them on the blog.  We hope that Blue Lapis Road will become a more comprehensive collection of our magnificent moments in life, at which we opened our hearts to see, listen and feel the world around us.  Before winter creeps in, we grew a little nostalgic here and decided to write about the Algonquin Provincial Park in Canada, a place that we frequented a few years ago for its vivid autumn colours, pristine bog scenery, elusive wildlife, and the sense of escape from busy urban life.

Located about 300km north of Toronto and 260km west of Ottawa, Algonquin has long been a tourist destination in the Province of Ontario since late 19th century.  Today, visitors go to Algonquin for all kinds of outdoor activities, including canoeing, camping, fishing, hiking, cross-country skiing, wildlife watching, horseback riding, mountain biking, etc.  Established as a provincial park since 1893, Algonquin has remained as a 7,600+ sq.km natural paradise in a transitional zone between northern coniferous and southern deciduous forests.  With over 2,400 lakes and 1,200km of waterways, Algonquin is truly a splendid land of waters and forests.

At dawn, the vivid skies project crystal clear reflections in the cold and tranquil water of Algonquin.  The rising mist and silhouette of spruce forest mark the distant horizon, separating the sky and the peaceful water.  Waterlilies float in the water like tiny brush strokes of an oil painting.  The sound of water made by the sudden movement of frogs, fishes or beavers occasionally break the silence.  As the sun rises, the vivid colour palette of the Canadian landscape emerges while the frost on timber boardwalk slowly disappears.  The haunting beauty of Algonquin’s misty landscape is so powerful that it lured us to get up early in the morning and ventured out there in freezing temperature with our cameras every time we visited the park.  The same dramatic scenery has touched the heart of many visitors, including famous painter Tom Thomson back in the 1910s, when he decided to move into the park to paint and lead a life of solitude after a few visits in 1912.  He resided in the park for five years and finished some of his most important works before drowning to death at Canoe Lake in Algonquin.

2Spruce Bog, a wetland system with accumulating peat and decaying moss, is a common scene in Algonquin.

3In many cases, spruce bog is submerged in water a few metres deep.

4Dawn at Spruce Bog Boardwalk in Algonquin Park.

5The Spruce Bog Boardwalk is a 1.5 km loop trail easily accessible from Hwy 60.

6Mist rises from the mirror-like lake in early morning.

7Much of the soil in Algonquin is saturated with water, allowing bogs and lakes to flourish.

8Early morning canoeing is popular in Algonquin.

9When driving along Hwy 60, the misty spruce bogs appear as occasional openings between dense woodlands.

10Perfect reflection of an utility pole in bog water.

11Dense spruce forest and peaceful misty water at Lake of Two Rivers in Algonquin.

12Vivid fall foliage at Lake of Two Rivers won’t disappoint any visitor.

13The peak moments for the fall colours are almost over.

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Read other posts on Parks of Southern Ontario
1.1 Land of Water and Forest, Algonquin Park, Ontario ( 1 of 3)
1.2 A Tale of Rocks and Maples, Algonquin, Ontario ( 2 of 3)
1.3 When Moose Meets Beaver, Algonquin, Ontario, (3/3)
2. Ancient Reef and Escarpment, Bruce Peninsula, Ontario
3. Algonquin Legend and Mazinaw Pictographs, Bon Echo Provincial Park, Ontario