ultramarinus – beyond the sea

Posts tagged “dam

ARRIVAL AT UDAWALAWE NATIONAL PARK, Sri Lanka, 2019.12.13

Day 9 (3 of 4).

After the morning walk to the Little Adam’s Peak and Nine Arches Bridge, we returned to Zion View Ella Green Retreat for a quick breakfast. The car came to Zion View Ella Green Retreat to pick us up right at 10:30.  We bid farewell to the two German shepherds and hopped on the car.  We left Ella behind and slowly descended from the hills.  Our next destination was Udawalawe, a small town between the hill country and the southern beaches.  The two hour drive from Ella to Udawalawe brought us from tea plantations and green hills to grasslands, marshes and forests, the home of diverse wildlife.  After world heritage historical sites and hills of tea plantations, our focus shifted once again to the natural treasure of Udawalawe National Park.

Established in 1972 as a sanctuary for wildlife displaced by the construction of Udawalawe Reservoir, the 30,821 hectares national park has become the third most visited park in the nation.  With an annual rainfall of 1,500mm, the park lies at the boundary between Sri Lanka’s wet and dry zones.  Within the park, there are marshes, grasslands and forests.  Udawalawe is famous for its 250 or so Sri Lanka elephants. Other mammal species found in the park include Sri Lankan leopard, rusty-spotted cat, sloth bear,  Sri Lanka sambar deer, Sri Lankan axis deer, wild boar, water buffalo, jackal, civet, monkey, mongoose, etc.  The park is also a good venue for bird watching, and so as reptiles including lizards, crocodiles, and snakes.

01Passing the Rawana Ella Falls on the Wellawaya Ella Kumbalwela Highway signified our departure from Ella.

03The more we get closer to Udawalawe, the higher the chance we might see wildlife along the highway.

02Domestic water buffalo are kept for their milk (curd and ghee) and rice cultivation.

04Sri Lankan elephant is undoubtedly the superstar in Udawalawe, and can often be seen along the road.

05Elephants are highly intelligent animals.  According to our driver, some of the curious males have learnt to approach the highway fence regularly to greet tourists in exchange for easy treats like bananas.

06Roadside stores near Udawalawe offer visitors a convenient stop for fruits, and perhaps have indirectly encouraged the unnatural habit of the highway approaching elephants.

08Despite the popularity of the national park, the town of Udawalawe is relatively tourist-free.  There is hardly any tourist souvenir shops along the main road.

09Bakery tuk tuk is quite common across the country.  As soon as we heard the music of Beethoven’s Fur Elise, we knew one of these mobile bread vendors must be nearby.

07Our guesthouse Green View Safari Resort was at a side street across the road from R/Emb/Udawalawa Primary School.

10Hidden from the dusty main road, our guesthouse for the night Green View Safari Resort was a simple little retreat.

11Facility was clean and simple.  The guesthouse owners arranged both the afternoon and morning safari for us.

12Dinner and breakfast were included in our one-night stay at Green View Safari Resort.

13To reach the national park from Udawalawe, our jeep would pass by Udawalawe Reservoir, a place of potential wildlife sighting before reaching the park entrance.

14Locals came to the dam to catch the sunset.

15The Udawalawe Dam separates the lush green forest on one side and the peaceful reservoir on the other.

16 The Udawalawe Dam provides a high ground to watch the distant scenery.

17The lush green forest revealed what the area might have look like before the construction of the reservoir.

18Local wildlife has adapted to the man-made environment of Udawalawe Reservoir.  The water has even attracted wildlife including birds and elephants.

19Beyond the reservoir, we finally arrived at the ticket office of Udawalawe National Park.

20We chose Udawalawe National Park over Yala National Park was an attempt to avoid overcrowding.  During our first safari visit, the entry route into the park was loaded with tourist 4×4 vehicles.  Luckily, as we ventured deeper into the park, we would have the park pretty much by ourselves.

 


TAI TAM COUNTRY PARK (大潭郊野公園), Hong Kong

Occupying about one fifth of area of Hong Kong Island, Tai Tam Country Park is one of the more accessible hiking destinations in the city.  The park is famous for its four reservoirs.  Built in 1888, 1904, 1907 and 1917 respectively, the Tai Tam Upper Reservoir (大潭上水塘), Tai Tam Byewash Reservoir (大潭副水塘), Tai Tam Intermediate Reservoir (大潭中水塘) and Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir (大潭篤水塘) served as the major water sources for Hong Kong Island in the early 20th century.  These reservoirs are surrounded by a series of green hills, including Mount Parker (柏架山), Mount Butler (畢拿山), Violet Hill (紫羅蘭山), and Jardine’s Lookout (渣甸山).  A series of hiking trails wind through the hills and pass by the reservoirs, making the country park a popular hiking destination in Hong Kong.

DSC_8917One of the trailheads begins at Mount Parker Road, at a densely populated area of Quarry Bay and just a stone throw away from Taikoo Place, a busy business district in East Hong Kong Island.

DSC_8922 The country park provides a decent view for the adjacent residential developments.  Built in 1989, the five 34-level towers of Mount Parker Lodge (康景花園) present some of the most typical private residential developments for the city’s middle class.

DSC_8924Looking over to Taikoo Place, the 69-storey One Island East Tower rises above the densed residential neighbourhood of Quarry Bay.

DSC_8931.JPGOpposite to Quarry Bay and Taikoo Place, the second highest peak of Hong Kong Island, Mount Parker, is marked by the observatory station.

DSC_8934To the south we were treated with the scenery of Tai Tam Tuk Reservoir and Tai Tam Bay.

DSC_8936As we reached the lookout of Mount Butler, we were treated with the view of Quarry Bay, Taikoo Place and the distant Kai Tak runway and East Kowloon.

DSC_8941A series of four water bodies make up the group of Tai Tam Reservoirs.

DSC_8943Looking west we could see the silhouette of Wanchai and Central in the haze.

DSC_8957Completed in late 1980s, the 18-tower Hong Kong Parkview (陽明山莊) is a luxurious residential and service apartment complex right by the country park.

DSC_8958We walked from the lookout of Mount Butler down to Wong Nai Chung Gap.

DSC_8959Soon we came to a lookout over Tai Tam Reservoir.

DSC_8964Looking northwest through Wong Nai Chung Gap (黃泥涌峽), the valley in the middle of Hong Kong Island, we could see the International Commerce Centre (ICC) and East Tsim Sha Tsui across Victoria Harbour.

DSC_7192Constructed between 1883 to 1888, the Reservoir Dam and Valve House of Tai Tam Upper Reservoir (大潭上水塘) were among the first phase of reservoir construction in Tai Tam.

DSC_7169The original dam was 30.5m high and 122m long, connected to a network that brought water through tunnels and aqueducts all the way to Central.

DSC_8974On our way down to Wong Nai Chung Gap (黃泥涌峽), we passed by a former granite quarry.

DSC_8970The old quarry is now occupied by the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Depot where the police deals with explosives.

DSC_8985Hong Kong Parkview (陽明山莊) is famous of its surrounding scenic views, and also its occasional break-ins.

DSC_8992We exited the country park near Wong Nai Chung Gap.  So we came to the historic Wong Nai Chung Reservoir (黃泥涌水塘).  Built in 1889 as Hong Kong’s third reservoir, Wong Nai Chung Reservoir has been used as a boat park for 30 years from 1986 to 2017.

DSC_8997Wong Nai Chung Reservoir is one of the six pre-war reservoir groups in the city.