ultramarinus – beyond the sea

Posts tagged “渋谷ヒカリエ

DAY 1 (1/6): ARRIVAL IN SHIBUYA, Tokyo, 2017.06.14

A brief Tokyo holiday in Mid-June 2017 was an ad-hoc decision after consecutive weeks of exhausting overtime work in April and May. With so much to offer as a cosmopolitan, Tokyo is an ideal destination that always delights us in various aspects from design exhibitions, novel fashion, seasonal delicacies to a simple cup of coffee. For five splendid days in the supposedly rainy season, we were fortunate to enjoy three full days of sunshine, and encountered only an hour or two of heavy rain on the last day as we were about to leave the Japanese capital on the Narita Express train.

Famed for its scramble crossing, youthful fashion and glittering neon lights, Shibuya (渋谷) of Tokyo also has a tranquil side lying just a block or two away from its vibrant shopping and entertainment scenes, and that was where we stayed for four nights at the periphery of the 24-hour vibrant actions of Shibuya.  Since the morning when the Narita Express train brought us directly from the airport after our red-eye flight from Hong Kong, we immediately found Shibuya an excellent base within walking distance to the surrounding neighborhoods such as Harajuku (原宿), Aoyama (青山), Ebisu (恵比寿), Daikanyama (代官山) and Nakameguro (中目黒), and a super convenient hub for public transit, where the JR Yamanote Line (山手線) intersects with several other Metro Lines and Private Railway Lines.

Our Tokyo journey 2017 began in Shibuya, in the midst of magnificent urban dynamic where the stylish young generation flock to the trendy fashion shops, where the locals gather around the statue of Hachikō (the loyal Akita dog (秋田犬) that continued to stay in front of Shibuya Station to wait for its owner for nine years after the owner’s death) to meet their friends, and where exciting tourists would stand in the flock of people at the scramble crossing for selfies in between traffic lights.  A slight drawback on staying in Shibuya was the intense construction works surrounding the station due to the upcoming Olympics Games.  With the new additions of commercial towers, underground shopping streets, and a beautiful new railway station, we anticipate a dramatic transformation of Shibuya before 2020. The current hoarding around construction sites, temporary walkways and directional signs enhance the maze-like character of this world’s fourth busiest railway station.  After all, we came to Tokyo to experience its magnificent urban vibrancy and dynamic cultures, and we were more than happy to call Shibuya home for five fantastic days.

01Even during a weekday morning, the scramble crossing of Shibuya is still teemed with pedestrians.
02The advertisement billboard of Kis-My-Ft2, the seven-member Japanese boy band, was the first thing we saw as we stepped out Shibuya Station after the two-hour Narita Express train ride.
03The wall of Shibuya Railway Station is decorated with relief of Hachikō (the loyal Akita dog (秋田犬) that continued to stay in front of Shibuya Station to wait for its owner for nine years after the owner’s death).  The bronze Hachikō statue nearby is a popular meeting place for the locals.
04Our hotel Sakura Fleur Aoyama was five minute walk away from Shibuya Station.
05We passed by the concourse of Shibuya Hikarie (渋谷ヒカリエ) every time we walked between Shibuya Station and our hotel.  Shibuya Hikarie is a mixed use tower comprised of offices, theatre, exhibition spaces and retail.
06We also frequented the footbridge between Shibuya Hikarie and the station.
07In the evening, the plaza in front of Shibuya Station is full of life.
08While most come to meet up with friends for shopping or dining, some Shibuya visitors would go beyond and come dressed in costumes.  We saw a young man dressed up as if Finn (played by John Boyega) in the Star Wars.
09In front of the station plaza is the iconic scramble crossing surrounded by LED advertisement screens and neon lights.
10In front of Shibuya Station Plaza, a couple on a bicycle stopped at the crossing.
11Every few minutes, a change of traffic lights would allow pedestrians to pour onto the tarmac crossing from all directions.  In midst of the crowds, there were always people (often tourists) standing still to take photographs of themselves and friends in the sea of people.
12Some selfie takers were quite serious and creative about their Shibuya Crossing photo.
13The vivid colours of advertisement screens and billbroads at Shibuya Crossing were often complemented with visitors dressed in outstanding outfits.
14The legendary Shibuya 109 was once the hub of youth fashion and styles.
15The iconic Shibuya Hikarie (second building from the left) may soon to be covered with new commercial towers.
16On the 11th floor of Shibuya Hikarie there is a sky lobby that allows visitors to have a birdeye’s view of central Shibuya.
17view of the scramble crossing from the sky lobby at Shibuya Hikarie.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIn Shibuya Hikarie, a display model of Shibuya of the near future clearly shows the upcoming additions (highlighted with internal lighting) to the already lively area.
19Near Shibuya Station, narrow Yokocho dining alleyways are some of the hidden gems in Shibuya.
20A few blocks away from the railway station and crossing, Shibuya has another side of low key tranquility.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAJust a few minutes walk from the vibrant scramble crossing, wandering in the peaceful streets of Shibuya almost felt like an otherworldly experience.
Advertisements

TOKYO’S TRIANGLE OF STYLE, Shibuya (渋谷), Harajuku (原宿) and Omotesando (表参道), Tokyo (東京), Japan

In Tokyo, it’s almost a ritual for every visitor to cross the iconic Shibuya(渋谷) Crossing on the way to a department store, or to search for cosplayers in the narrow Takeshita (竹下通) of Harajuku (原宿), or to admire the high fashion and sleek architecture along Omotesando (表参道).  Despite it is only the distance of one station apart from each other, the urban scenery and shopping culture around the station of Shibuya, Harajuku and Omotesando are actually quite different.  Geographically, Shibuya is a special ward in Tokyo that encompasses some of the most important commercial and shopping districts in the city, such as Daikanyama, Ebisu, Harajuku, Omotosando, and Sendagaya.  Spending an afternoon wandering in this vibrant area is a movable feast of style.

1Shibuya Hikarie (渋谷ヒカリエ), the iconic monument at the heart of Shibuya, is a mixed use high-rise tower with multiple functions, including office, theatre, auditorium, galleries and museum, dining facilities, and department store.

DSC_2811The railway station of Shibuya (渋谷) is the fourth busiest communter railway station in Japan (and the world).

2-4Pedestrians rush out the Shibuya Station, wait for the traffic lights to turn and then scramble to radiate in all directions.  The famous Shibuya Crossing has become an icon for Tokyo.  Uncounted promotional videos, TV shows and movies such as Lost in Translation have made the Shibuya Crossing immortal as part of Tokyo’s identity.

5A stop north of Shibuya (渋谷) along the Yamanote Line (山手線) brings us to Harajuku (原宿).  Built in 1906, the timber structure of Harajuku is the oldest wooden railway station in Tokyo.  Construction of a new station building is underway in time for 2020’s Tokyo Olympics.  The fate of the original timber building has yet been determined.

6Very popular with teenage shoppers, the pedestrian Takeshita Street (竹下通) is the destination to find cute merchandises aimed for the young generation.

7Takeshita Street (竹下通) is full of cafes, eateries, small shops, and of course young shoppers.

8

9The side streets in Harajuku (原宿) are lined with small shops and boutiques, each carries its own style of decorations and identity.

10Made in Okayama, the small and cozy Full Count denim is one of my favorite shop in the area.  They were the first Japanese denim company to use Zimbabwean cotton.

11It was impossible not to revisit Omotesando (表参道) when I was in the area.  Completed in 2004, SANAA’s Dior Omotesando (ディオール表参道店) looked as cool as ever.  Last time I came in 2014 the building was covered in scaffolding.

12Diagonally across Omotesando (表参道) from SANAA’s Dior, Tadao Ando’s Omotesando Hills, a long and narrow shopping centre, was flooded with a rainbow of LED lights.

13Controversially, Ando’s Omotesando Hills in Aoyama (青山) has replaced the former Bauhaus inspired Dojunkai Aoyama Apartments built in 1927.  A small section of the former apartment has been reconstructed as part of Omotesando Hills.

14Cladded with a weaving system of aluminium, Takenaka’s Stella McCartney on Omotesando (表参道) is a small architectural gem across the street from Herzog de Meuron’s Prada.

15Built in 2003, Herzog de Meuron’s Prada Aoyama (青山) is perhaps the most well known architecture on Omotesando (表参道) .

15aAfter over a decade, the glazing system of Herzog de Meuron’s Prada Aoyama (青山) still matches the essence of contemporary design.

16Further into Aoyama, we reached the Spiral Building on Aoyama Dori.  Completed in 1985, Fumihiko Maki’s building was named after its large spiral ramp.  The complex houses a design shop and cafe, as well as exhibitions.

17Sit against the window on the upper level of the Spiral Building and look at the urban scenery outside along Aoyama Dori is peaceful and relaxing.

18The new star at Softbank Omotesando (ソフトバンク表参道) near Harajuku Station was the humanoid robots called Pepper.

19In a sleek white appearance and the ability to interact with users, the Pepper humanoid robots were fun to play with.  As population aging emerges as a huge issue in Japan, humanoid robots may soon become a household necessity in the future.