ultramarinus – beyond the sea

THE TRAGEDY OF APAMEA, Hama, Syria

2006.05.12

From Aleppo we took a morning bus to Hama, a laidback little city between Aleppo and Damascus.  Under the morning sun, the combination of shading palm, olive and fruit trees, centuries old stone houses and winding alleys, Hama looked like a photo perfect Middle Eastern town.  At first we had trouble orienting ourselves.  A taxi driver came by and helped us for the right direction towards town centre and Cairo Hotel.  Cairo Hotel was clean and the staff was friendly.  We joined one of the tours they offered for the Crusade castles and archaeological ruins nearby.

Our first stop was the massive ruins of Apamea.  From the 2 km-long Great Colonnade, we could truly appreciate the enormous scale of the ancient city, which was once a major trading hub with a population of up to half a million as some researchers estimated.  After the conquest of Alexander the Great, Apamea was ruled under the Seleucid kings before the Roman arrived.  Because of its strategical location on the trading routes, the city continued to flourish in Roman times.  For all the wrong reasons, Apamea made news headlines in recent years as satellite images revealed the Luna landscape like destruction of the site due to massive looting.  Irreversible damages, especially along the famous Grand Colonnade area, were discovered after the government army regained control of the site.  During the civil war, thousands of holes were dug in the ground by treasure hunters.  Mosaics and all kinds of precious artefacts were brutally removed and sold in the black market by amateur treasure hunters, including desperate civilians from nearby communities who might not have other economic means to survive the war.  It was a story of how a local warfare would lead to a terrible loss for the entire humanity.  In the 21st century this should never have happened, but in reality these kinds of tragedies have never ceased to exist in our history.

06ME26-01Apamea withstood different challenges in the past two thousand years, but the recent destruction would probably be proven too much for the ancient city to bear.  “Once a great city, now just empty holes” was how University of Glasgow recently described the site in an article titled Count the holes: the looting of Apamea, Syria.

06ME26-05From the conquest of Alexander the Great to the Romans, Apamea thrived as an Hellenistic city, then a provincial capital during the Roman times.

06ME26-07Many remaining structures are dated to the Roman era.

06ME26-09Anything decorative or with artistic values are probably gone by now.

Apamea 5The 2km Great Colonnade was one of the longest in the Roman world, but sadly it also suffered the most damages during the civil war.  Thousands of holes were made in the area for treasure hunting.  Uncounted artefacts have been stolen, including many priceless mosaic floors that have gone into the black market.  Since 2012, Interpol has been involved in searching for the looted items.

06ME26-02It would take a long time to even comprehend how extensive the actual destruction was.

06ME25-36Ancient Roman Latin inscriptions and detail carvings might be gone.

06ME25-31Google aerial views reveal the site is now filled with holes all over.  Many of the unexcavated treasures hidden from our sight in 2006 are gone by now.

06ME25-34Let’s hope the tragic story of Apamea would not repeat again somewhere else.

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