ultramarinus – beyond the sea

MIRISSA HILLS CINNAMON PLANTATION, Mirissa, Sri Lanka, 2019.12.15

Day 11 (2 of 2).

Cinnamomum verum, or true cinnamon tree, is an evergreen tree native to Sri Lanka.  Considered as the better tasting and has more health benefits than the other types of cinnamon cultivated elsewhere in Asia and Africa, the inner bark of Cinnamomum verum has been a precious commodity sought after by the West since colonial times.  Sri Lanka nowadays exports roughly 85-90% of the world’s true cinnamon.  Spice plantations can be found in many parts of the island, including the South Coast.

We stayed at Mirissa Hills, a working cinnamon plantation near Mirissa, for two nights.  At the plantation, there are three buildings that offer guest accommodation.  We stayed at a building called the “Museum”, a work-in-progress cinnamon museum.  At Mirissa Hills, we got a chance to join a plantation tour to learn more about cinnamon production.

01Our room was located at the “Museum” building, around halfway up the hill of the plantation estate.

02Inside the “Museum”building,  four guestrooms are allocated on both sides of the courtyard.

03Despite the age of the building, our room was quite comfortable.

04The main building, Mount Cinnamon, is located 5 minutes walk uphill from the Museum.  Designed by architect C. Anjalendran, Mount Cinnamon is an hidden architectural gem in the midst of dense vegetation.

05Served as an apprentice of architectural master Geoffrey Bawa, C. Anjalendran is a leading architect of today’s Sri Lanka.  At Mount Cinnamon, C. Anjalendran arranges the guestrooms around the courtyard and swimming pool.

06The common room in Mount Cinnamon is dominated by Laki Senanayake’s sculpture “Enchanted Forest”.

07Laki Senanayake worked as an assistant to architect Geoffrey Bawa, and created a number of sculptures and murals for Bawa’s buildings.

09Outside the common room, the covered veranda was where we had breakfast and dinner.

08The two dogs of the estate often lingered around the veranda.  One of the dogs is already 16 years old.

10The pavilion in the backyard served as the dancing stage for peacocks to attract other peahens.

11After breakfast, we walked over to a covered veranda serving as a gallery for sculpture and artwork.

12Seeing such an interesting collection of artwork was a great surprise for us.

13In the second afternoon just before most staff called it a day, we followed the manager for a cinnamon tour.  The manager showed us cinnamon trees of different sizes and ages.  The cinnamon trees were virtually everywhere in the estate: by the road, behind the buildings, on the hill slope, etc., just that we didn’t notice them until the tour.

14At the factory, a staff showed us how to remove the bark of the cinnamon branch.

16The bark rolls were then placed over our heads for drying.

15From 1970 to now, international production of cinnamon has grown more than tenfold.  It is hard to imagine that such popular spice could still be processed in such a simple and traditional manner.  Such production method in Sri Lanka hasn’t changed much in the past few centuries.

17In the morning of December 16th, Mirissa Hills arranged a car to drop us at Galle.

18We passed by a series of beaches near Weligama.  Occasionally we would see empty stilts near the shore.  The traditional fishermen that Steve McCurry encountered in the mid 1990s were long gone.  Today, the stilts are mainly for tourist to take selfies or locals to mimic their the bygone fishermen and let tourists to photograph them for a fee.

19Most beaches were empty except occasional surfers.  Half day in Galle and a dinner in Colombo would make up the last day of our Sri Lankan journey.

 

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